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“Schooling Can’t Buy Me Loveâ€: Marriage, Work, and the Gender Education Gap in Latin America

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  • Ganguli, Ina
  • Hausmann, Ricardo
  • Viarengo, Martina

Abstract

In this paper we establish six stylized facts related to marriage and work in Latin America and present a simple model to account for them. First, skilled women are less likely to be married than unskilled women. Second, skilled women are less likely to be married than skilled men. Third, married skilled men are more likely to work than unmarried skilled men, but married skilled women are less likely to work than unmarried skilled women. Fourth, Latin American women are much more likely to marry a less skilled husband compared to women in other regions of the world. Five, when a skilled Latin American woman marries down, she is more likely to work than if she marries a more or equally educated man. Six, when a woman marries down, she tends to marry the “better†men in that these are men that earn higher wages than those explained by the other observable characteristics. We present a simple game theoretic model that explains these facts with a single assumption: Latin American men, but not women, assign a greater value to having a stay-home wife.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Harvard Kennedy School of Government in its series Scholarly Articles with number 4448873.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Publication status: Published in Faculty Research Working Paper Series
Handle: RePEc:hrv:hksfac:4448873

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  1. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2008. "Planning and Financial Literacy: How Do Women Fare?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 413-17, May.
  2. Psacharopoulos, George & Tzannatos, Zafiris, 1993. "Economic and Demographic Effects on Working Women in Latin America," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 6(4), pages 293-315, November.
  3. Graziella Bertocchi & Marianna Brunetti & Costanza Torricelli, 2008. "Marriage and Other Risky Assets: A Portfolio Approach," Department of Economics 0606, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
  4. Betsey Stevenson & Justin Wolfers, 2007. "Marriage and Divorce: Changes and their Driving Forces," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 21(2), pages 27-52, Spring.
  5. Betsey Stevenson, 2008. "Divorce Law and Women's Labor Supply," NBER Working Papers 14346, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Imran Rasul, 2006. "Marriage Markets and Divorce Laws," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 30-69, April.
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