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Micro-level Evidence from Rwanda

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  • Philip Verwimp

    ()
    (World Bank, Rwanda)

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a research project in which we have traced 350 Rwandan households who were part of a rural household survey before the Rwandan genocide (1994). Economic, demographic and agricultural data from an extensive 1989-1992 survey can be linked with the condition of the household at the time of the Genocide Transition Survey (2000). This allows us to study the fate of the household members during the genocide. Our results show that age, sex, the sex of the head of the household, the size of rented land, personal off-farm income, gross household income and farm-level anti-erosion investment significantly determine the probability of a household member to become a perpetrator of genocide. These results are interpreted in the political economy of Rwanda.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Households in Conflict Network in its series HiCN Working Papers with number 08.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:08

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Web page: http://www.hicn.org

Related research

Keywords: peasants; survey research; genocide; Rwanda;

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References

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  1. Duncan Thomas & Elizabeth Frankenberg & James P. Smith, 2000. "Lost But Not Forgotten: Attrition and Follow-up in the Indonesian Family Life Survey," Working Papers, RAND Corporation Publications Department 00-03, RAND Corporation Publications Department.
  2. Byiringiro, Fidele & Reardon, Thomas, 1996. "Farm productivity in Rwanda: effects of farm size, erosion, and soil conservation investments," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, Blackwell, vol. 15(2), pages 127-136, November.
  3. Arulampalam, W. & Robin A. Naylor & Jeremy P. Smith, 2002. "University of Warwick," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2002, Royal Economic Society 9, Royal Economic Society.
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Cited by:
  1. Kati Schindler & Tilman Brück, 2011. "The Effects of Conflict on Fertility in Rwanda," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1143, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  2. Florence Kondylis, 2007. "Conflict-Induced Displacement and Labour Market Outcomes: Evidence from Post-War Bosnia and Herzegovina," CEP Discussion Papers, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE dp0777, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  3. Iyer, Lakshmi & Santos, Indhira, 2012. "Creating jobs in South Asia's conflict zones," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 6104, The World Bank.
  4. Florence Kondylis, 2008. "Agricultural Outputs and Conflict Displacement: Evidence from a Policy Intervention in Rwanda," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 57(1), pages 31-66, October.
  5. Markus Brückner, 2011. "Population Size, Per Capita Income, and the Risk of Civil War: Regional Heterogeneity in the Structural Relationship Matters," Working Paper Series, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER) UNU-WIDER Working Paper W, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  6. Joseph Flavian Gomes, 2012. "The political economy of the Maoist conflict in India : an empirical analysis," Economics Working Papers we1218, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.

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