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Power outages and economic growth in Africa

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  • Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck

    ()
    (Department of Business and Economics)

  • Dalgaard, Carl-Johan

    ()
    (Department of Economics)

Abstract

This paper estimates the total effect of power outages on economic growth in Sub-Saharan Africa over the period 1995-2007. Outages are instrumented using a satellite-based measure of lightning density. As suggested by Henderson et al. (2011), we also combine Penn World Tables GDP data with satellite-based data on nightlights to arrive at a more accurate measure of economic growth. Our results suggest that the annual economic growth drag of a weak power infrastructure is about 2 percentage points.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Business and Economics, University of Southern Denmark in its series Discussion Papers of Business and Economics with number 7/2012.

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Length: 14 pages
Date of creation: 28 Feb 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:sdueko:2012_007

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Department of Business and Economics, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark
Phone: 65 50 32 33
Fax: 65 50 32 37
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Web page: http://www.sdu.dk/ivoe
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Related research

Keywords: Economic growth; public utilities; electricity; earthlights; Africa;

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References

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  1. Jimenez, Emmanuel, 1995. "Human and physical infrastructure: Public investment and pricing policies in developing countries," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 43, pages 2773-2843 Elsevier.
  2. Angus Deaton, 2010. "Instruments, Randomization, and Learning about Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 48(2), pages 424-55, June.
  3. Charles I. Jones, 2011. "Intermediate Goods and Weak Links in the Theory of Economic Development," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 1-28, April.
  4. Christopher H. Achen, 2005. "Let's Put Garbage-Can Regressions and Garbage-Can Probits Where They Belong," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 22(4), pages 327-339, September.
  5. J. Vernon Henderson & Adam Storeygard & David N. Weil, 2009. "Measuring Economic Growth from Outer Space," NBER Working Papers 15199, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Thomas Barnebeck Andersen & Jeanet Bentzen & Carl-Johan Dalgaard & Pablo Selaya, 2012. "Lightning, IT Diffusion, and Economic Growth Across U.S. States," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 94(4), pages 903-924, November.
  7. Ozturk, Ilhan, 2010. "A literature survey on energy-growth nexus," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 340-349, January.
  8. Olsson, Ola & Hibbs, Douglas Jr., 2005. "Biogeography and long-run economic development," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(4), pages 909-938, May.
  9. Robert J. Barro, 2012. "Convergence and Modernization Revisited," NBER Working Papers 18295, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Randall Filer & Jan Hanousek & Dana Hajkova, 2007. "A Rise By Any Other Name? Sensitivity of Growth Regressions to Data Source," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp889, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  11. Taryn Dinkelman, 2011. "The Effects of Rural Electrification on Employment: New Evidence from South Africa," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(7), pages 3078-3108, December.
  12. Aschauer, David Alan, 1989. "Is public expenditure productive?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 177-200, March.
  13. Anton Eberhard & Vivien Foster & Cecilia Briceño-Garmendia & Fatimata Ouedraogo & Daniel Camos & Maria Shkaratan, 2008. "Underpowered : The State of the Power Sector in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7833, The World Bank.
  14. World Bank, 2008. "Africa Development Indicators 2007," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 12363, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Andersen, Thomas Barnebeck & Jensen, Peter Sandholt, 2013. "Is Africa's recent growth sustainable?," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 8/2013, Department of Business and Economics, University of Southern Denmark.
  2. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Dinh, Hinh, 2013. "From Imitation to Innovation: Public Policy for Industrial Transformation," World Bank - Economic Premise, The World Bank, issue 115, pages 1-8, May.
  3. Agenor, Pierre-Richard & Dinh, Hinh T., 2013. "Public policy and industrial transformation in the process of development," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6405, The World Bank.
  4. Bahman Kashi, 2014. "Risk Management and the Stated Capital Costs by Independent Power Producers," Development Discussion Papers 2014-03, JDI Executive Programs.
  5. Arouri, Mohamed El Hedi & Ben Youssef, Adel & M'henni, Hatem & Rault, Christophe, 2014. "Exploring the Causality Links between Energy and Employment in African Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 8296, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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