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A three-stage model of the Academy-Industry linking process: the perspective of both agents

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  • De Fuentes, Claudia

    ()
    (CIRCLE, Lund University)

  • Dutrénit, Gabriela

    ()
    (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco)

Abstract

Interactions between public research organizations and industry can be conceptualized in three main stages: the engagement in collaboration, the knowledge transfer during collaboration, and the benefits perceived from collaboration. Both agents differ in terms of the incentives to collaborate and the behaviors they adopt along these three stages. Following a three stages model based on Crépon, Duguet and Mairesse (1998), this paper discusses the impact of drivers to collaborate on channels of interaction, and the impact of channels of interaction on benefits for both agents -researchers and firms, and discusses the policy implications. The study is based on original data collected by two surveys carried out in Mexico during 2008, to R&D and product development managers of firms and to academic researchers. Our results show different perceptions from both agents across the three stages of the linking process; the main drivers for firms’ collaboration are largely related to behavioral characteristics (formalization of R&D activities, fiscal incentives for R&D and openness strategy), while for researchers they are associated with individual (academic degree, members of a team, type of research -basic science and technology development) and institutional factors (affiliation to public research centres. All channels of interaction play an important role in determining benefits for researchers and firms; however, R&D projects & consultancy channel play a particular important role for long-term benefits, while the information & training channel is particularly important for short-term benefits. Usually policies do not discriminate much between agents’ perception at each stage of the linking process and introduce general programs that look for stimulating interaction by both agents; this unique incentive to promote interaction will probably fail to change agents’ behavior. Thus, a better understanding of the different perspectives will contribute to more efficient policy programs.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy in its series CIRCLE Electronic Working Papers with number 2010/6.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 01 Oct 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:lucirc:2010_006

Contact details of provider:
Postal: CIRCLE, Lund University, PO Box 117, SE-22100 Lund, Sweden
Phone: +46 (0) 46 222 74 68
Web page: http://www.circle.lu.se/
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Related research

Keywords: university-industry interactions; collaboration drivers; channels of interaction; benefits; innovation policy; developing countries; Mexico;

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  1. Balconi, Margherita & Laboranti, Andrea, 2006. "University-industry interactions in applied research: The case of microelectronics," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 1616-1630, December.
  2. James D. Adams & Eric P. Chiang & Jeffrey L. Jensen, 2000. "The Influence of Federal Laboratory R&D on Industrial Research," NBER Working Papers 7612, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Bekkers, Rudi & Bodas Freitas, Isabel Maria, 2008. "Analysing knowledge transfer channels between universities and industry: To what degree do sectors also matter?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 1837-1853, December.
  4. Valeria Arza, 2010. "Channels, benefits and risks of public—private interactions for knowledge transfer: conceptual framework inspired by Latin America," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(7), pages 473-484, August.
  5. Arvanitis, Spyros & Kubli, Ursina & Woerter, Martin, 2008. "University-industry knowledge and technology transfer in Switzerland: What university scientists think about co-operation with private enterprises," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 1865-1883, December.
  6. Gabriela Dutrénit & Claudia De Fuentes & Arturo Torres, 2010. "Channels of interaction between public research organisations and industry and their benefits: evidence from Mexico," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(7), pages 513-526, August.
  7. D'Este, P. & Patel, P., 2007. "University-industry linkages in the UK: What are the factors underlying the variety of interactions with industry?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1295-1313, November.
  8. Mohamed Ayadi & Mohieddine Rahmouni & Murat Yildizoglu, 2009. "Determinants of the Innovation Propensity in Tunisia: the Central Role of External Knowledge Sources," Working Papers halshs-00368560, HAL.
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