Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Diferencias en la efectividad de los canales de interacción sobre los beneficios obtenidos por investigadores y empresas en México

Contents:

Author Info

  • Gabriela Dutrénit

    ()
    (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco)

  • Carla De Fuentes

    (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco)

  • Arturo Torres

    (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Xochimilco; Universidad de Ottawa, Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Departamento de Economía.)

Abstract

It is widely recognized that universities and public research centers, hereinafter referred to public research organizations (PROs) are producers and transmitters of knowledge, and as such can make important contributions both to increase the economic performance of firms and to solve societal problems.The process of knowledge transfer between PROs and industry occurs through multiple channels of interaction, however the effectiveness of different channels on the benefits perceived by both agents differs. Based on micro data of academic researchers and firms in Mexico, this paper explores what channels of interactions are the most effective for triggering different benefits received by researchers and firms involved in such interactions. We built two Heckman´s two-step estimation procedure models, one for researchers and one for firms. The first stage determines the drivers of interaction and then eliminates the selection bias, while the second identify the most important channels to benefit from interaction. Our findings suggest that researchers are knowledge driven rather than economic driven, as they valuate more Intellectual than Economic benefits. Firms perceive Production benefits as more important than Innovation benefits, which suggest that they tend to connect to PRO for short-term problem solving rather than to get insights for long-term innovative strategies. The Bi-directional channel (knowledge flows in both directions) is the most important in providing benefits for both researchers (intellectual benefits) and firms (Innovation and Production benefits). Dual benefits coming from this channel could contribute to building virtual circles for PRO-industry interaction. But other channels are only effective either for researchers (Traditional) or for firms (Services), which raise a policy issue about the need identified the drivers that explain the likelihood of firms and researchers to establish linkages. In the case of researchers, the drivers that explain the probability to connect with firms are: (i) skills (knowledge), academic collaboration and (iii) institutiponal affiliation. In the case of firms, the main are the following: (i) openness strategy (particularly open sources and suppliers) and fiscal incentives for R&D, and (ii) perception about the role of PRO for the creation and transfer of knowledge.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.fcs.edu.uy/archivos/2710.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics - dECON in its series Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) with number 2710.

as in new window
Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:2710

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Constituyente 1502, 6to piso, CP 11200, Montevideo
Phone: (598) 2410-6449
Fax: (598) 2410-6450
Email:
Web page: http://www.fcs.edu.uy/subcategoria.php?SubCatId=48&CatId=53
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: university-industry linkages; collaboration drivers; channels of interaction; benefits; innovation policy; developing countries; Mexico.;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Rosenberg, Nathan & Nelson, Richard R., 1994. "American universities and technical advance in industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 323-348, May.
  2. D'Este, P. & Patel, P., 2007. "University-industry linkages in the UK: What are the factors underlying the variety of interactions with industry?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1295-1313, November.
  3. James J. Heckman, 1977. "Dummy Endogenous Variables in a Simultaneous Equation System," NBER Working Papers 0177, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. James D. Adams & Eric P. Chiang & Jeffrey L. Jensen, 2003. "The Influence of Federal Laboratory R&D on Industrial Research," Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics 0301, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics.
  5. A C Fernandes & B Campello de Souza & A Stamford da Silva & W Suzigan & C V Chaves & E Albuquerque, 2010. "Academy—industry links in Brazil: evidence about channels and benefits for firms and researchers," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(7), pages 485-498, August.
  6. Gabriela Dutrénit & Claudia De Fuentes & Arturo Torres, 2010. "Channels of interaction between public research organisations and industry and their benefits: evidence from Mexico," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 37(7), pages 513-526, August.
  7. Wesley M. Cohen & Richard R. Nelson & John P. Walsh, 2002. "Links and Impacts: The Influence of Public Research on Industrial R&D," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 48(1), pages 1-23, January.
  8. Paul E. Bierly & Fariborz Damanpour & Michael D. Santoro, 2009. "The Application of External Knowledge: Organizational Conditions for Exploration and Exploitation," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(3), pages 481-509, 05.
  9. Meyer-Krahmer, Frieder & Schmoch, Ulrich, 1998. "Science-based technologies: university-industry interactions in four fields," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 835-851, December.
  10. Laursen, Keld & Salter, Ammon, 2004. "Searching high and low: what types of firms use universities as a source of innovation?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 1201-1215, October.
  11. Bekkers, Rudi & Bodas Freitas, Isabel Maria, 2008. "Analysing knowledge transfer channels between universities and industry: To what degree do sectors also matter?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 1837-1853, December.
  12. Spyros Arvanitis & Nora Sydow & Martin Woerter, 2008. "Is there any Impact of University–Industry Knowledge Transfer on Innovation and Productivity? An Empirical Analysis Based on Swiss Firm Data," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 77-94, March.
  13. Wright, Mike & Clarysse, Bart & Lockett, Andy & Knockaert, Mirjam, 2008. "Mid-range universities' linkages with industry: Knowledge types and the role of intermediaries," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(8), pages 1205-1223, September.
  14. Welsh, Rick & Glenna, Leland & Lacy, William & Biscotti, Dina, 2008. "Close enough but not too far: Assessing the effects of university-industry research relationships and the rise of academic capitalism," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 1854-1864, December.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ude:wpaper:2710. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Irene Musio) or (Héctor Pastori).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.