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Household Formation Rules, Fertility and Female Labour Supply: Evidence from post-communist countries

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  • Louise Grogan

    ()
    (Department of Economics and Finance,University of Guelph)

Abstract

This paper explains how household formation rules affect the fertility and labour supply of women in the Former Soviet Union and neighbouring countries. Women who bear a male first child in countries dominated by traditional, patrilocal households are shown to have sub- stantially lower subsequent fertility from those whose first child is female. Where households are generally nuclear, male first borns do not reduce subsequent fertility. Middle-aged women in more patrilocal contexts often work less if their first child is male, despite reduced fertility and being more likely to reside with a daughter-in-law. In more nuclear contexts, they tend to work more. These findings suggest that household formation rules are strongly related both to women’s demand for sons and to the direction of intergenerational transfers.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance in its series Working Papers with number 1302.

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Length: 39
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:gue:guelph:2013-02

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Keywords: household formation rules; fertility; daughter-in-law; deferred compensation; Central Asia; Russia; Soviet Union; patrilocality; intergenerational transfers;

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References

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  1. Orlowski, Lucjan T, 1995. " Direct Transfers between the Former Soviet Union Central Budget and the Republics: Past Evidence and Current Implications," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 59-73.
  2. Matthew J. Baker & Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2007. "A Human Capital-Based Theory of Postmarital Residence Rules," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(1), pages 208-241, April.
  3. Siwan Anderson & Debraj Ray, 2010. "Missing Women: Age and Disease," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 77(4), pages 1262-1300.
  4. Panda, Pradeep & Agarwal, Bina, 2005. "Marital violence, human development and women's property status in India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(5), pages 823-850, May.
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  7. Kenneth Hill & Yoonjoung Choi, 2006. "Neonatal mortality in the developing world," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 14(18), pages 429-452, May.
  8. Chung, Woojin & Das Gupta, Monica, 2007. "Why is son preference declining in South Korea ? the role of development and public policy, and the implications for China and India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4373, The World Bank.
  9. Orlowski, Lucjan T, 1995. " Corrigendum [Direct Transfers between the Former Soviet Union Central Budget and the Republics: Past Evidence and Current Implications]," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 28(2-3), pages 235-37.
  10. Gunnar Andersson & Karsten Hank & Marit Rønsen & Andres Vikat, 2006. "Gendering family composition: Sex preferences for children and childbearing behavior in the Nordic countries," Demography, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 255-267, May.
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  12. Lokshin, Michael & Harris, Kathleen Mullan & Popkin, Barry M., 2000. "Single Mothers in Russia: Household Strategies for Coping with Poverty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(12), pages 2183-2198, December.
  13. Klasen, Stephan, 1994. ""Missing women" reconsidered," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(7), pages 1061-1071, July.
  14. Rao, Vijayendra, 1997. "Wife-beating in rural South India: A qualitative and econometric analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 44(8), pages 1169-1180, April.
  15. Louise Grogan, 2007. "Patrilocality and human capital accumulation," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 15, pages 685-705, October.
  16. Gordon B. Dahl & Enrico Moretti, 2008. "The Demand for Sons," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(4), pages 1085-1120.
  17. Paul A. Samuelson, 1958. "An Exact Consumption-Loan Model of Interest with or without the Social Contrivance of Money," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 66, pages 467.
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