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Neonatal mortality in the developing world

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  • Kenneth Hill

    (Harvard University)

  • Yoonjoung Choi

    (Johns Hopkins University)

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    Abstract

    This paper examines age patterns and trends of early and late neonatal mortality in developing countries, using birth history data from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). Data quality was assessed both by examination of internal consistency and by comparison with historic age patterns of neonatal mortality from England and Wales. The median neonatal mortality rate (NMR) across 108 nationally-representative surveys was 33 per 1000 live births. NMR averaged an annual decline of 1.7 % in the 1980s and 1990s. Declines have been faster for late than for early neonatal mortality and slower in Sub-Saharan Africa than in other regions. Age patterns of neonatal mortality were comparable with those of historical data, indicating no significant underreporting of early neonatal deaths in DHS birth histories.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 14 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 18 (May)
    Pages: 429-452

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:14:y:2006:i:18

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: birth history; early neonatal mortality rate; heaping; late neonatal mortality rate; mortality; neonatal mortality;

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    Cited by:
    1. Michael Spagat, 2010. "Estimating the Human Costs of War: The Sample Survey Approach," HiCN Research Design Notes, Households in Conflict Network 14, Households in Conflict Network.
    2. Grogan, Louise, 2013. "Household formation rules, fertility and female labour supply: Evidence from post-communist countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 1167-1183.
    3. Louise Grogan, 2013. "Household Formation Rules, Fertility and Female Labour Supply: Evidence from post-communist countries," Working Papers, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance 1302, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.
    4. Anthopolos, Rebecca & Becker, Charles M., 2010. "Global Infant Mortality: Correcting for Undercounting," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 467-481, April.

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