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Measuring child labor: Comparisons between hours data and subjective measures

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  • Dillon, Andrew

Abstract

"This paper examines a subjective measure of child labor as an alternative to hours data for eliciting the distribution of children's time between work, school, and leisure. The subjective child labor questions that were developed have two primary advantages. First, the subjective measures avoid proxy respondent bias in child labor reports made by parents in a standard hours module. Second, the subjective child labor module scales responses to elicit the relative distribution of the shares of children's time without relying on hours data which are prone to severe outlier problems. Adult, proxy respondents are found to produce uniformly lower reports of children's time allocated to work and school than the child's own subjective responses. Conditional labor supply functions are also estimated to examine the marginal effects of child, parent, household and school characteristics between the two types of data. Children's subjective responses are found to increase the magnitude of the marginal effects for child's age, parental education, and school availability with limited differences between household composition and asset variables." from authors' abstract

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI discussion papers with number 879.

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Date of creation: 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:879

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Related research

Keywords: Child labor; Questionnaire design; Development strategies; Childcare and work; Gender;

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References

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  1. Dillon, Andrew, 2008. "Child labor and schooling responses to production and health shocks in northern Mali:," IFPRI discussion papers 755, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1976. "Child Endowments and the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages S143-62, August.
  3. de Janvry, Alain & Fafchamps, Marcel & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1991. "Peasant Household Behaviour with Missing Markets: Some Paradoxes Explained," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(409), pages 1400-417, November.
  4. Edmonds, Eric V., 2008. "Child Labor," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
  5. Heckman, James J, 1974. "Shadow Prices, Market Wages, and Labor Supply," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 42(4), pages 679-94, July.
  6. Becker, Gary S & Lewis, H Gregg, 1973. "On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages S279-88, Part II, .
  7. Ucw, 2011. "Understanding the Brazilian success in reducing child labour: empirical evidence and policy lessons. Drawing policy lessons from the Brazilian experience," UCW Working Paper 55, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
  8. Dumas, Christelle & Lambert, Sylvie, 2006. "Trajectoires de scolarisation et de travail des enfants au Sénégal," ILO Working Papers 390760, International Labour Organization.
  9. Mellow, Wesley & Sider, Hal, 1983. "Accuracy of Response in Labor Market Surveys: Evidence and Implications," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(4), pages 331-44, October.
  10. Lybbert, Travis J. & Barrett, Christopher B. & McPeak, John G. & Luseno, Winnie K., 2007. "Bayesian Herders: Updating of Rainfall Beliefs in Response to External Forecasts," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 480-497, March.
  11. Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1977. "The Demand for Children in Farm Households," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(1), pages 123-46, February.
  12. Cigno, Alessandro & Rosati, Furio Camillo, 2005. "The Economics of Child Labour," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199264452.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Dammert, Ana C. & Galdo, Jose, 2013. "Child Labor Variation by Type of Respondent: Evidence from a Large-Scale Study," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 207-220.
  2. F. Blanco & C. A. Valdivia, 2006. "Child labour in Venezuela: children's vulnerability to macroeconomic shocks," UCW Working Paper 52, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).

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