Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

U.S. Unconventional Monetary Policy and Transmission to Emerging Market Economies

Contents:

Author Info

  • Bowman, David

    ()
    (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.))

  • Londono, Juan M.

    ()
    (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.))

  • Sapriza, Horacio

    ()
    (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.))

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    We investigate the effects of U.S. unconventional monetary policies on sovereign yields, foreign exchange rates, and stock prices in emerging market economies (EMEs), and we analyze how these effects depend on country-specifc characteristics. We find that, although EME asset prices, mainly those of sovereign bonds, responded strongly to unconventional monetary policy announcements, these responses were not outsized with respect to a model that takes into account each country's time-varying vulnerability to U.S. interest rates affected by monetary policy shocks.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/ifdp/2014/1109/ifdp1109.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.) in its series International Finance Discussion Papers with number 1109.

    as in new window
    Length: 44 pages
    Date of creation: 23 Jun 2014
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:1109

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 20th Street and Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20551
    Web page: http://www.federalreserve.gov/
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Web: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/ifdp/order.htm

    Related research

    Keywords: Unconventional monetary policy; emerging markets; large-scale asset purchase program; quantitative easing; Federal Reserve;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Jessica James & Kristjan Kasikov, 2008. "Impact of economic data surprises on exchange rates in the inter-dealer market," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(1), pages 5-15.
    2. Ben S. Bernanke & Kenneth N. Kuttner, 2003. "What explains the stock market's reaction to Federal Reserve policy?," Staff Reports 174, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    3. Michael A. S. Joyce & Ana Lasaosa & Ibrahim Stevens & Matthew Tong, 2011. "The Financial Market Impact of Quantitative Easing in the United Kingdom," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 7(3), pages 113-161, September.
    4. Valentina Bruno & Hyun Song Shin, 2013. "Capital Flows and the Risk-Taking Channel of Monetary Policy," Working Papers 1469, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies..
    5. Arvind Krishnamurthy & Annette Vissing-Jorgensen, 2011. "The Effects of Quantitative Easing on Interest Rates: Channels and Implications for Policy," NBER Working Papers 17555, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Shaghil Ahmed & Andrei Zlate, 2013. "Capital flows to emerging market economies: a brave new world?," International Finance Discussion Papers 1081, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    7. Geert Bekaert & Marie Hoerova & Marco Lo Duca, 2012. "Risk, uncertainty and monetary policy," Working Paper Research 229, National Bank of Belgium.
    8. Fratzscher, Marcel & Lo Duca, Marco & Straub, Roland, 2012. "A global monetary tsunami? On the spillovers of US Quantitative Easing," CEPR Discussion Papers 9195, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    9. Hausman, Joshua & Wongswan, Jon, 2011. "Global asset prices and FOMC announcements," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 547-571, April.
    10. Roberto Rigobon, 2003. "Identification Through Heteroskedasticity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(4), pages 777-792, November.
    11. De Pooter, Michiel & Robitaille, Patrice & Walker, Ian & Zdinak, Michael, 2014. "Are Long-Term Inflation Expectations Well Anchored in Brazil, Chile and Mexico?," International Finance Discussion Papers 1098, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    12. Arvind Krishnamurthy & Annette Vissing-Jorgensen, 2011. "The Effects of Quantitative Easing on Interest Rates: Channels and Implications for Policy," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 43(2 (Fall)), pages 215-287.
    13. Roberto Rigobon & Brian Sack, 2001. "Measuring the Reaction of Monetary Policy to the Stock Market," NBER Working Papers 8350, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Jonathan H. Wright, 2012. "What does Monetary Policy do to Longā€term Interest Rates at the Zero Lower Bound?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 122(564), pages F447-F466, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:1109. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Kris Vajs).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.