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Cluster Evolution and a Roadmap for Future Research

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  • Ron Boschma

    ()

  • Dirk Fornahl

    ()

Abstract

There is increasing recognition that the existence of clusters can only be understood when studying their dynamics over time (Audretsch and Feldman 1996; Pouder and St. John 1996; Swann et al. 1998; Maggioni 2002; Brenner 2004; Iammarino and McCann 2006; Menzel and Fornahl 2010; Ter Wal and Boschma 2011). In fact, clusters may be best understood as products of a path-dependent process (Martin and Sunley 2006). In that context, scholars have described the main features of cluster development over time, and have explored the driving forces behind their evolution. In their seminal contribution, Menzel and Fornahl (2010) proposed a cluster life cycle model in which firms enter and exit the cluster, capabilities of cluster firms develop and interact (and might converge), and inter-organizational linkages within and beyond the cluster are established and dissolved along the cluster life cycle.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography in its series Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) with number 1117.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2011
Date of revision: Aug 2011
Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:1117

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Keywords: Downward causation; Economic landscape; emergence; Evolution; Supervenience;

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References

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  1. Raphael Suire & Jérome Vicente, 2009. "Why do some places succeed when others decline? A social interaction model of cluster viability," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(3), pages 381-404, May.
  2. Peter Maskell & Anders Malmberg, 2007. "Myopia, knowledge development and cluster evolution," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(5), pages 603-618, September.
  3. Ron A. Boschma & Anne L.W. ter Wal, 2006. "Knowledge networks and innovative performance in an industrial district. The case of a footwear district in the South of Italy," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0601, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Jan 2006.
  4. Uwe Cantner & Holger Graf, 2004. "The Network of Innovators in Jena: An Application of Social Network Analysis," Jenaer Schriften zur Wirtschaftswissenschaft 04/2004, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  5. Frank Neffke & Martin Henning & Martin Ron Boschma, 2009. "How do regions diversify over time? Industry relatedness and the development of new growth paths in regions," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0916, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Oct 2009.
  6. Jackie Krafft, 2004. "Entry, exit and knowledge: evidence from a cluster in the info-communications," Post-Print hal-00203625, HAL.
  7. Max-Peter Menzel & Dirk Fornahl, 2010. "Cluster life cycles--dimensions and rationales of cluster evolution," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 205-238, February.
  8. Pierre-Alexandre Balland, 2009. "Proximity and the Evolution of Collaboration Networks: Evidence from R&D Projects within the GNSS Industry," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0914, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Oct 2009.
  9. Orsenigo, L. & Pammolli, F. & Riccaboni, Massimo, 2001. "Technological change and network dynamics: Lessons from the pharmaceutical industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 485-508, March.
  10. Jerome Vicente & Pierre Balland & Olivier Brossard, 2011. "Getting into Networks and Clusters: Evidence from the Midi-Pyrenean Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Collaboration Network," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(8), pages 1059-1078.
  11. Andrea Morrison, 2008. "Gatekeepers of Knowledge within Industrial Districts: Who They Are, How They Interact," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(6), pages 817-835.
  12. Simona Iammarino & Philip McCann, 2006. "The Structure and Evolution of Industrial Clusters: Transactions, Technology and Knowledge Spillovers," SPRU Working Paper Series 138, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex.
  13. Ron Martin & Peter Sunley, 2006. "Path dependence and regional economic evolution," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(4), pages 395-437, August.
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Cited by:
  1. Matthias Duschl & Tobias Scholl & Thomas Brenner & Dennis Luxen & Falk Raschke, 2013. "Industry-specific firm growth and agglomeration," ERSA conference papers ersa13p134, European Regional Science Association.
  2. Lucia Cusmano & Andrea Morrison & Enrico Pandolfo, 2014. "Spinoff and Clustering: a return to the Marshallian district," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1416, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Jul 2014.
  3. Jose-Luis Hervas-Oliver & Jose Albors-Garrigos, 2013. "Are Technological Gatekeepers Constraining my Cluster? Unfolding the paradox of gatekeepers resilience across cluster life cycle stages," DRUID Working Papers 13-04, DRUID, Copenhagen Business School, Department of Industrial Economics and Strategy/Aalborg University, Department of Business Studies.
  4. Jose-Luis Hervas-Oliver, 2012. "Are technological gatekeepers constraining my cluster? Unfolding the paradox of gatekeepers resilience across cluster life cycle stages," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1206, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised May 2012.
  5. Dominik Santner & Dirk Fornahl, 2014. "While explaining cluster internal impacts on cluster development, cluster life cycle theory fails to explain the influence of cluster external factors. Based on a multiscalar approach, this study inve," Working Papers on Innovation and Space 2014-02, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.

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