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The Balance of Brains: Corruption and High Skilled Migration

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Author Info

  • Andrea ARIU

    ()
    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) and FNRS)

  • Pasquamaria SQUICCIARINI

    ()
    (KULeuven, LICOS Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance and Department of Economics)

Abstract

In a mobile labor market, a high emigration rate of high skilled workers is not necessarily a problem, if counterbalanced by a high immigration rate. However, some countries experience a net gain of high skilled while others a net loss. Corruption is part of the explanation, acting through two different channels: first, it pushes skilled natives to virtuous countries, where they can find a job based on meritocratic criteria; second, it discourages the entry of foreign talents, which would hardly have access to string-pulling recommendations. This might induce a prolonged loss in human capital and vanish investments in education.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) in its series Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) with number 2013010.

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Length: 8
Date of creation: 15 May 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2013010

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Keywords: migration; high-skilled; corruption;

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References

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  1. Frédéric Docquier & B. Lindsay Lowell & Abdeslam Marfouk, 2009. "A Gendered Assessment of Highly Skilled Emigration," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 35(2), pages 297-321.
  2. Michel Beine & Romain Noël & Lionel Ragot, 2012. "The Determinants of International Mobility of Students," CESifo Working Paper Series 3848, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Knack, Stephen & Keefer, Philip, 1995. "Institutions and Economic Performance: Cross-Country Tests Using Alternative Institutional Indicators," MPRA Paper 23118, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Daniel Chiquiar & Gordon H. Hanson, 2002. "International Migration, Self-Selection, and the Distribution of Wages: Evidence from Mexico and the United States," NBER Working Papers 9242, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Paul M Romer, 1999. "Increasing Returns and Long-Run Growth," Levine's Working Paper Archive 2232, David K. Levine.
  6. Laurent Simula & Alain Trannoy, 2012. "Shall we keep the highly skilled at home? The optimal income tax perspective," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer, vol. 39(4), pages 751-782, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Cooray, Arusha & Schneider, Friedrich, 2014. "Does Corruption Promote Emigration? An Empirical Examination," IZA Discussion Papers 8094, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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