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Sectoral Effects of Tax Reforms in an Open Economy

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  • Olivier CARDI

    ()
    (Université Panthéon-Assas ERMES, Ecole Polytechnique)

  • Romain RESTOUT

    ()
    (UNIVERSITE CATHOLIQUE DE LOUVAIN, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES))

Abstract

We use a neoclassical open economy model with traded and non traded goods to investigate the sectoral effects of three tax reforms: i) two revenue-neutral shifting the tax burden from labor to consumption taxes and ii) one labor tax restructuring keeping the marginal tax wedge constant. Regardless of its type, a tax reform crowds-in both consumption and investment and raises employment. Whereas tax reforms have a small impact on GDP, they exert substantial effects on sectoral outputs which move in opposite direction in the short-run. The sensitivity analysis reveals that raising the elasticity of labor supply or reducing the tradable content in consumption expenditure amplifies the heterogeneity in sectoral output responses. Finally, allowing for the markup to depend on the number of competitors, we find that a substantial share of sectoral output variations can be attributed to the change in the markup triggered by firm entry.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES) in its series Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) with number 2010045.

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Length: 30
Date of creation: 21 Dec 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvir:2010045

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Keywords: Non Traded Goods; Employment; Current Account; Tax Reform;

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  1. Paul Cashin & C. John McDermott, 2003. "Intertemporal Substitution and Terms-of-Trade Shocks," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(4), pages 604-618, 09.
  2. Coenen, Günter & McAdam, Peter & Straub, Roland, 2008. "Tax reform and labour-market performance in the euro area: A simulation-based analysis using the New Area-Wide Model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 2543-2583, August.
  3. Ben Heijdra & Jenny Ligthart, 2009. "Labor tax reform, unemployment, and search," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 82-104, February.
  4. Wu, Yangru & Zhang, Junxi, 2000. "Endogenous markups and the effects of income taxation:: Theory and evidence from OECD countries," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(3), pages 383-406, September.
  5. Coto-Martinez, Javier & Dixon, Huw, 2003. "Profits, markups and entry: fiscal policy in an open economy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 573-597, February.
  6. Mathias Trabandt & Harald Uhlig, 2006. "How Far Are We From The Slippery Slope? The Laffer Curve Revisited," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2006-023, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  7. N. Gregory Mankiw & Matthew Weinzierl, 2004. "Dynamic Scoring: A Back-of-the-Envelope Guide," NBER Working Papers 11000, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Domeij, David & Floden, Martin, 2001. "The labor-supply elasticity and borrowing constraints: Why estimates are biased," Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 480, Stockholm School of Economics.
  9. Morten O. Ravn & Karel Mertens, 2009. "Understanding the Aggregate Effects of Anticipated and Unanticipated Tax Policy shocks," 2009 Meeting Papers 480, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  10. Vikas Kakkar, 2003. "The Relative Price of Nontraded Goods and Sectoral Total Factor Productivity: An Empirical Investigation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(2), pages 444-452, May.
  11. Yang, Xiaokai & Heijdra, Ben J, 1993. "Monopolistic Competition and Optimum Product Diversity: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(1), pages 295-301, March.
  12. Turnovsky Stephen J. & Sen Partha, 1995. "Investment in a Two-Sector Dependent Economy," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 29-55, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Richard M. Bird & Michael Smart, 2012. "Financing Social Expenditures in Developing Countries: Payroll or Value Added Taxes?," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1206, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.

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