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Around the European Periphery 1870-1913: Globalization, Schooling and Growth

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  • O'Rourke, Kevin H
  • Williamson, Jeffrey G

Abstract

On average, the poor European periphery converged on the rich industrial core in the four or five decades prior to World War I. Some, like the three Scandinavian economies, used industrialization to achieve a spectacular convergence on the leaders, especially in real wages and living standards. Some, like Ireland, achieved convergence without industrialization. Some, like Italy, underwent a less spectacular catch-up, which was limited to the industrializing North. Some, like Iberia, actually fell back. What accounts for this variety? What role did trade and tariff policy play? What about emigration and capital flows? What about schooling? We offer a tentative assessment of these contending explanations and conclude that globalization was by far the dominant force accounting for convergence (and divergence) around the periphery. Some exploited it well, and some badly.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 1343.

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Date of creation: Feb 1996
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1343

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Keywords: Convergence; Education; Globalization; History;

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Cited by:
  1. Ralph Hippe & Joerg Baten, 2011. "Regional Inequality in Human Capital Formation in Europe, 1790 - 1880," Working Papers 11-07, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
  2. Di Vaio, Gianfranco & Enflo, Kerstin, 2011. "Did globalization drive convergence? Identifying cross-country growth regimes in the long run," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(6), pages 832-844, August.
  3. Gianfranco Di Vaio & Kerstin Enflo, 2009. "Did Globalization Lead to Segmentation? Identifying Cross-Country Growth Regimes in the Long-Run," Working Papers CELEG 0902, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza, LUISS Guido Carli.
  4. Emanuele Felice, 2011. "Regional value added in Italy over the long run (1891-2001): linking indirect estimates with official figures, and implications," UHE Working papers 2011_04, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Departament d'Economia i Història Econòmica, Unitat d'Història Econòmica.
  5. Spagat, Michael, 2002. "Human Capital and the Future of Transition Economies," CEPR Discussion Papers 3517, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Schiff, Maurice, 1996. "South-North migration and trade : a survey," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1696, The World Bank.
  7. Albert Carreras & Camilla Josephson, 2009. "Growing at the production frontier. European aggregate growth, 1870-1914," Economics Working Papers 1179, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
  8. John FitzGerald & Ide Kearney, 1999. "Migration and the Irish Labour Market," Papers WP113, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  9. Foreman-Peck, James, 2009. "The Western European Marriage Pattern and Economic Development," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2009/15, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
  10. Cameron, G., 1998. "Catch-Up and Leapfrog Between The USA and Japan," Economics Papers 148, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
  11. Aurelian Plopeanu, “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” & Peter Foldvari & Bas van Leeuwen & Jan Luiten van Zanden, 2012. "Where do ideas come from? Book production and patents in global and temporal perspective," Working Papers 0033, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
  12. John FitzGerald & Jonathan Hore, 2002. "Wage Determination in Economies in Transition: Ireland, Spain and Portugal," Papers WP147, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  13. Williamson, Jeffrey G., 1998. "Growth, Distribution, and Demography: Some Lessons from History," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 241-271, July.
  14. John FitzGerald, 1998. "Wage Formation and the Labour Market," Papers WP095, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  15. John FitzGerald, 1999. "Understanding Ireland's Economic Success," Papers WP111, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  16. Crayen, Dorothee & Baten, Joerg, 2010. "Global trends in numeracy 1820-1949 and its implications for long-term growth," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 82-99, January.
  17. Kévin H. O’Rourke & Richard Sinnott, 2004. "Flux migratoires : économie politique de la migration et enjeux empiriques," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 18(3), pages 45-76.

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