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Asset Price Targeting Government Spending and Equilibrium Indeterminacy in A Sticky-Price Economy

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  • Kengo Nutahara

Abstract

This study investigates aggregate implications of fiscal policy that responds to asset price fluctuations. In our sticky-price model, the monetary authority follows a Taylor rule and the fiscal authority follows a rule that the target of government spending is asset prices and responds negatively to the asset price fluctuations. It is shown that government spending that targets asset prices is a source of equilibrium indeterminacy.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The Canon Institute for Global Studies in its series CIGS Working Paper Series with number 13-003E.

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Length: 24
Date of creation: May 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cnn:wpaper:13-003e

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  1. Guo, Jang-Ting & Harrison, Sharon G., 2004. "Balanced-budget rules and macroeconomic (in)stability," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 119(2), pages 357-363, December.
  2. Shin-ichi Fukuda & Junji Yamada, 2011. "Stock Price Targeting and Fiscal Deficit in Japan: Why Did the Fiscal Deficit Increase . during Japan's Lost Decades?," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-819, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
  3. Chryssi Giannitsarou, 2004. "Balanced Budget Rules and Aggregate Instability: The Role of Consumption Taxes," Econometric Society 2004 North American Summer Meetings 173, Econometric Society.
  4. Yun, Tack, 1996. "Nominal price rigidity, money supply endogeneity, and business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 345-370, April.
  5. Christopher J. Erceg & Dale W. Henderson & Andrew T. Levin, 1999. "Optimal monetary policy with staggered wage and price contracts," International Finance Discussion Papers 640, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  6. Leeper, Eric M., 1991. "Equilibria under 'active' and 'passive' monetary and fiscal policies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 129-147, February.
  7. Fukuda, Shin-ichi & Yamada, Junji, 2011. "Stock price targeting and fiscal deficit in Japan: Why did the fiscal deficit increase during Japan’s lost decades?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 447-464.
  8. Charles T. Carlstrom & Timothy S. Fuerst, 2004. "Asset prices, nominal rigidities, and monetary policy," Working Paper 0413, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
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