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Racial Diversity and Macroeconomic Productivity across US States and Cities

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The United States is growing increasingly diverse, so it is important that economists understand the macroeconomic consequences of diversity within the US economy. International analyses often argue that heterogeneity reduces macroeconomic productivity by engendering corruption, political instability, and social turmoil. However, other studies claim that diversity improves creative decision making and augments productivity. This paper exploits differences in diversity across regions of the United States from 1980 to 2000 to determine whether racial heterogeneity creates macroeconomic gains or losses for states and cities. Fixed effects analysis indicates that diversity enhances the productivity of cities. Evidence at the state-level is more ambiguous, as significant results only appear in random effects specifications.

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File URL: http://commons.colgate.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1000&context=econ_facschol
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, Colgate University in its series Working Papers with number 2007-01.

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Date of creation: Nov 2007
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Handle: RePEc:cgt:wpaper:2007-01

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Keywords: Racial Diversity; Macroeconomic Productivity;

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Cited by:
  1. Max Nathan, 2011. "The Long Term Impacts of Migration in British Cities: Diversity, Wages, Employment and Prices," SERC Discussion Papers 0067, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
  2. Philipp Ager & Markus Bruckner, 2011. "Cultural Diversity and Economic Growth: Evidence from the US during the Age of Mass Migration," School of Economics Working Papers 2011-02, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
  3. Michaela Trax & Stephan Brunow & Jens Suedekum, 2012. "Cultural diversity and plant‐level productivity," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2012029, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  4. Stephan Brunow & Hanna Brenzel, 2012. "The effect of a culturally diverse labour supply on regional income in the EU," Empirica, Springer, vol. 39(4), pages 461-485, November.
  5. Sparber, Chad, 2007. "Racial Diversity and Aggregate Productivity in U.S. Industries: 1980-2000," Working Papers 2007-02, Department of Economics, Colgate University.
  6. Neil Lee, 2013. "Cultural Diversity, Cities and Innovation: firm Effects or City Effects?," SERC Discussion Papers 0144, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
  7. Parrotta, Pierpaolo & Pozzoli, Dario & Pytlikova, Mariola, 2012. "Does Labor Diversity Affect Firm Productivity?," IZA Discussion Papers 6973, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Dirk Dohse & Robert Gold, 2013. "Measuring Cultural Diversity at a Regional Level," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 10, WWWforEurope.
  9. Parrotta, Pierpaolo & Pozzoli, Dario & Pytlikova, Mariola, 2014. "Labor diversity and firm productivity," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 144-179.

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