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Perception of Workplace Discrimination among Immigrants and Native Born New Zealanders

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Author Info

  • Daldy, Bridget

    ()
    (University of Waikato)

  • Poot, Jacques

    ()
    (University of Waikato)

  • Roskruge, Matthew

    ()
    (University of Waikato)

Abstract

Despite considerable research on differences in labour market outcomes between native born New Zealanders and immigrants, the extent of discrimination experienced by the foreign born in the workplace remains relatively unexplored. We use micro data from the Confidentialised Unit Record File of the 2008 New Zealand General Social Survey (n = 8,721) to examine the determinants of self-reported discrimination in the workplace. We find that immigrants are significantly more likely than New Zealand-born employees to report that they experience discrimination in the workplace. There are noticeable gender differences in determinants of perceived discrimination, which interact with birthplace. The highest likelihood of self-reported workplace discrimination is found amongst migrants from Asia and the Pacific Islands. Discrimination is more likely to be reported by those with higher education and those who are mid-career. We test and correct for selection bias in measuring the impact of factors influencing perceived discrimination and find such bias to be present for men but not for women.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 7504.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Australian Journal of Labour Economics, 2013, 16 (1), 137-154
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7504

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Keywords: New Zealand; workplace discrimination; immigration; sample selection bias;

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  1. Heckman, James J, 1979. "Sample Selection Bias as a Specification Error," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 153-61, January.
  2. Van de Ven, Wynand P. M. M. & Van Praag, Bernard M. S., 1981. "The demand for deductibles in private health insurance : A probit model with sample selection," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 229-252, November.
  3. Philip Oreopoulos, 2011. "Why Do Skilled Immigrants Struggle in the Labor Market? A Field Experiment with Thirteen Thousand Resumes," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 148-71, November.
  4. Rob Hodgson & Jacques Poot, 2011. "New Zealand Research on the Economic Impacts of Immigration 2005-2010: Synthesis and Research Agenda," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1104, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  5. Heywood, John S., 1989. "Wage discrimination by race and gender in the public and private sectors," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 99-102.
  6. Rupa Banerjee, 2008. "An Examination of Factors Affecting Perception of Workplace Discrimination," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 380-401, December.
  7. Kevin Lang & Jee-Yeon K. Lehmann, 2011. "Racial Discrimination in the Labor Market: Theory and Empirics," NBER Working Papers 17450, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Jacques Poot & Steven Stillman, 2010. "The importance of heterogeneity when examining immigrant education-occupation mismatch: evidence from New Zealand," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1023, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  9. Paul W. Miller & Barry R. Chiswick, 1999. "Language skills and earnings among legalized aliens," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 63-89.
  10. Scott E. Page, 2007. "Prologue to The Difference: How the Power of Diversity Creates Better Groups, Firms, Schools, and Societies
    [The Difference: How the Power of Diversity Creates Better Groups, Firms, Schools, and So
    ," Introductory Chapters, Princeton University Press.
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