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Trade, Wage Gaps, and Specific Human Capital Accumulation

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  • Ngo Van Long
  • Raymond Riezman
  • Antoine Soubeyran

Abstract

We develop a new framework for the analysis of the impact of trade liberalization on the wage structure. Our model focuses on the decision of workers to accumulate firm-specific skills, by “on-the-job” training, knowing that this means their future wages will have to be negotiated, and that the outcome of negotiation will depend on the profitability prospect of firms operating in a new trading environment. We show that trade liberalization may reduce the welfare of a developing country because of its adverse effect on skill accumulation. We also explore the effects of trade liberalization on the wage gap between skilled and unskilled workers.

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File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/WP/WP-CESifo_Working_Papers/wp-cesifo-2003/wp-cesifo-2003-04/cesifo_wp911.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 911.

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Date of creation: 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_911

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Keywords: wage gap; human capital; trade liberalization;

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References

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  1. Falvey, R., 1995. "Trade Liberalisation and factor Price Convergence," Papers 290, Australian National University - Department of Economics.
  2. Donald R. Davis, 1996. "Does European Unemployment Prop up American Wages?," NBER Working Papers 5620, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Findlay, Ronald & Kierzkowski, Henryk, 1983. "International Trade and Human Capital: A Simple General Equilibrium Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(6), pages 957-78, December.
  4. Long, N.V. & Wong, K.Y., 1996. "Endogenous Growth and International Trade: A Survey," Discussion Papers in Economics at the University of Washington 96-07, Department of Economics at the University of Washington.
  5. Edward E. Leamer, 1996. "What's the Use of Factor Contents?," NBER Working Papers 5448, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Spiros Bougheas & Richard Kneller & Raymond Riezman, 2011. "Optimal Education Policies And Comparative Advantage," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(5), pages 538-552, December.
  2. Rod Falvey & David Greenaway & Joana Silva, . "International Competition, Returns to Skill and Labor Market Adjustment," Discussion Papers 08/10, University of Nottingham, GEP.
  3. Emily Blanchard & Gerald Willmann, 2007. "Political Stasis or Protectionist Rut? Policy Mechanisms for Trade Reform in a Democracy," CESifo Working Paper Series 2070, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Rod Falvey & David Greenaway & Joana Silva, . "Trade Liberalisation and Human Capital Adjustment," Discussion Papers 10/08, University of Nottingham, GEP.
  5. Blanchard, Emily & Willmann, Gerald, 2011. "Escaping a protectionist rut: Policy mechanisms for trade reform in a democracy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1), pages 72-85, September.
  6. Anwar, Sajid & Rice, John, 2009. "Labour mobility and wage inequality in the presence of endogenous foreign investment," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1135-1139, November.
  7. Wang, Ming-cheng & Fang, Chen-ray & Huang, Li-hsuan, 2009. "International knowledge spillovers and wage inequality in developing countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1208-1214, November.
  8. Richard G. Harris & Peter Robertson, 2009. "Trade, Wages And Skill Accumulation In The Emerging Giants," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 09-19, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  9. Ngo Van Long & Viet Do, 2007. "International Outsourcing under Monopolistic Competition: Winners and Losers," Departmental Working Papers 2007-06, McGill University, Department of Economics.
  10. Anwar, Sajid & Sun, Sizhong, 2012. "Trade liberalisation, market competition and wage inequality in China's manufacturing sector," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 1268-1277.
  11. Antoni, Manfred & Janser, Markus & Lehmer, Florian, 2014. "The hidden winners of renewable energy promotion : insights into sector-specific wage differentials," IAB Discussion Paper 201412, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].

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