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Using Mixed Methods in Monitoring and Evaluation: Experiences from International Development’

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  • Michael Bamberger
  • Vijayendra Rao
  • Michael Woolcock

Abstract

This paper reviews the main challenges and opportunities for incorporating mixed method approaches into research and evaluation on the effectiveness and impacts of international development. It draws on the authors’ experience over several decades working in both academia and with a wide range of multilateral and bilateral development agencies, non-profit organisations and developing country governments on the evaluation of the effectiveness and impacts of development interventions. Development research is informed by current research trends in Northern countries, but it is often conducted within very distinct economic, political, cultural and organisational contexts. While certainly not unique to the international context, many development evaluations are subject to a range of budget, time, data, political and organisational constraints that tend to be more severe than those faced by researchers working in industrialised nations. Moreover, due to the more limited opportunities to conduct research in developing countries, individual studies or evaluations are often required to address a broader set of questions. So while a researcher in the US may be able to focus exclusively on a rigorous summative evaluation designed to address a limited range of questions on quantitative impacts, the same researcher evaluating a major development intervention in Latin America, Africa or Asia may be asked to address a wider range of summative and formative questions. We argue that the demand for multi-purpose evaluations in developing countries opens up opportunities for a broader application of mixed method approaches than is usually the case in ‘mainstream’ mixed method research. We hope that this paper will help readers to understand the unique challenges, and also the great

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File URL: http://www.bwpi.manchester.ac.uk/medialibrary/publications/working_papers/bwpi-wp-10709.pdf
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Paper provided by BWPI, The University of Manchester in its series Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series with number 10709.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:bwp:bwppap:10709

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  1. François Bourguignon & Maurizio Bussolo & Luiz A. Pereira da Silva, 2008. "The Impact of Macroeconomic Policies on Poverty and Income Distribution : Macro-Micro Evaluation Techniques and Tools," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6586, October.
  2. Rao, Vijayendra & Gupta, Indrani & Jana, Smarajit, 2000. "Sex workers and the cost of safe sex - the compensating differential for condom use in Calcutta," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2334, The World Bank.
  3. Benjamin A. Olken, 2007. "Monitoring Corruption: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Indonesia," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 200-249.
  4. Christopher Gibson & Michael Woolcock, 2007. "Empowerment, Deliberative Development and Local Level Politics in Indonesia: Participatory Projects as a Source of Countervailing Power," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 0807, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
  5. Ravallion, Martin, 2005. "Evaluating anti-poverty programs," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3625, The World Bank.
  6. Lant Pritchett, 2002. "It pays to be ignorant: A simple political economy of rigorous program evaluation," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(4), pages 251-269.
  7. Angus S. Deaton, 2009. "Instruments of development: Randomization in the tropics, and the search for the elusive keys to economic development," NBER Working Papers 14690, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Jha, Saumitra & Rao, Vijayendra & Woolcock, Michael, 2007. "Governance in the Gullies: Democratic Responsiveness and Leadership in Delhi's Slums," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 230-246, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Vinod Thomas & Xubei Luo, 2011. "Overlooked Links in the Results Chain," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2347, October.
  2. Niño-Zarazúa, Miguel, 2012. "Quantitative analysis in social sciences: An brief introduction for non-economists," MPRA Paper 39216, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. De Hoop, Thomas & Van Kempen, Luuk & Linssen, Rik & Van Eerdewijk, Anouka, 2010. "Women's Autonomy and Subjective Well-Being in India: How Village Norms Shape the Impact of Self-Help Groups," MPRA Paper 25921, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Deval Desai & Michael Woolcock, 2012. "The politics of rule of law systems in developmental states: 'political settlements' as a basis for promoting effective justice institutions for marginalized groups," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series esid-008-12, BWPI, The University of Manchester.

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