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Temptation and Social Preference

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Author Info

  • Jawwad Noor

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Boston University)

  • Linxia Ren

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Boston University)

Abstract

This paper shows in an experiment that giving rates in a dictator game increase significantly if payments are offered with delay. We hypothesize that a temptation to be selfish may be at play in social preferences. We model this and demonstrate that our model is consistent with much of the existing evidence on dictator games as well. The possible relationship with other social preference theories, such as warm glow, altruism and concern for social image, are discussed and differences in welfare conclusions highlighted.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Boston University - Department of Economics in its series Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series with number WP2011-040.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:bos:wpaper:wp2011-040

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Postal: 270 Bay State Road, Boston, MA 02215
Phone: 617-353-4389
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Web page: http://www.bu.edu/econ/
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Related research

Keywords: Normative preference; temptation; social preference; dictator games; welfare; warm glow; altruism; social image;

References

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  1. Stefano DellaVigna & John A. List & Ulrike Malmendier, 2012. "Testing for Altruism and Social Pressure in Charitable Giving," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 127(1), pages 1-56.
  2. Jawwad Noor, 2005. "Commitment and Self-Control," Microeconomics 0509008, EconWPA.
  3. Neilson, William S., 2009. "A theory of kindness, reluctance, and shame for social preferences," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 394-403, May.
  4. John A. List, 2007. "On the Interpretation of Giving in Dictator Games," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115, pages 482-493.
  5. Jawwad Noor, 2010. "Temptation and Revealed Preference," Boston University - Department of Economics - Working Papers Series WP2010-040, Boston University - Department of Economics.
  6. Kopylov Igor, 2009. "Temptations in General Settings," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-25, September.
  7. Edward Lazear & Ulrike Malmendier & Roberto Weber, 2006. "Sorting, Prices, and Social Preferences," NBER Working Papers 12041, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Nicholas Bardsley, 2008. "Dictator game giving: altruism or artefact?," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 122-133, June.
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