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Bridge Jobs: A Comparison across Cohorts

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Author Info

  • Michael D. Giandrea

    ()
    (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics)

  • Kevin E. Cahill

    ()
    (Analysis Group, Inc.)

  • Joseph F. Quinn

    ()
    (Boston College)

Abstract

Are today's youngest retirees following in the footsteps of their older peers with respect to gradual retirement? Recent evidence from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) suggests that most older Americans with full-time career jobs later in life transitioned to another job prior to complete labor force withdrawal. This paper explores the retirement patterns of a younger cohort of individuals from the HRS known as the "War Babies." These survey respondents were born between 1942 and 1947 and were 57 to 62 years of age at the time of their fourth bi-annual HRS interview in 2004. We compare the War Babies to an older cohort of HRS respondents and find that, for the most part, the War Babies have followed the gradual-retirement trends of their slightly older predecessors. Traditional one-time, permanent retirements appear to be fading, a sign that the impact of changes in the retirement income landscape since the 1980s continues to unfold.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Boston College Department of Economics in its series Boston College Working Papers in Economics with number 670.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: 30 May 2007
Date of revision: 22 Dec 2008
Handle: RePEc:boc:bocoec:670

Note: Previously circulated as "An Update on Bridge Jobs: the HRS War Babies"
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Keywords: Economics of Aging; Partial Retirement; Gradual Retirement;

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  1. Ruhm, Christopher J, 1990. "Bridge Jobs and Partial Retirement," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(4), pages 482-501, October.
  2. Kevin E. Cahill & Michael D. Giandrea & Joseph F. Quinn, 2006. "A Micro-level Analysis of Recent Increases in Labor Force Participation among Older Workers," Working Papers 400, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
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Cited by:
  1. Gorodnichenko, Yuriy & Song, Jae & Stolyarov, Dmitriy, 2013. "Macroeconomic Determinants of Retirement Timing," IZA Discussion Papers 7744, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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