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Technical progress, retraining cost and early retirement

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  • Lorenzo Burlon

    ()
    (Bank of Italy)

  • Montserrat Vilalta-Bufí

    ()
    (University of Barcelona)

Abstract

Technological progress affects early retirement in two opposing ways. On the one hand, it increases real wages and thus produces an incentive to postpone retirement. On the other hand, it erodes workers' skills, making early retirement more likely. Using the Health and Retirement Study surveys, we re-examine the effect of technical progress on early retirement, finding that when the technical change is small the erosion effect dominates, but when it is large the wage effect dominates. Our results imply that retraining cost is a strongly concave function with respect to technical progress.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area in its series Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) with number 963.

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Date of creation: Jun 2014
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Handle: RePEc:bdi:wptemi:td_963_14

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Keywords: technical progress; retraining; retirement;

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  1. Avner Ahituv & Joeph Zeira, . "Technical Progress and Early Retirement," Working Papers 0801, University of Crete, Department of Economics.
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  13. Jenny Meyer, 2011. "Workforce age and technology adoption in small and medium-sized service firms," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 305-324, October.
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