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Leaving Home: What Economics Has to Say about the Living Arrangements of Young Australians

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  • Deborah A. Cobb-Clark

Abstract

Like their counterparts elsewhere, more young Australians than ever are delaying the move to establish residential independence from their parents. This paper reviews the developing economics literature surrounding young people’s decisions to continue living in their parents’ homes in order to begin to assess the causes and consequences of this decision. In particular, co-residence with parents appears to be an important form of intergenerational support for young adults. It is important to understand the extent to which young people rely on this form of support as they complete their education, enter the labour market, and establish themselves as independent adults. Specific attention is paid to the ways in which Australian income-support, education, and housing policies may influence these patterns.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 568.

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Date of creation: Jan 2008
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Handle: RePEc:auu:dpaper:568

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Keywords: Economics of the family; Household decision-making;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Anna Baranowska, 2011. "Trash contracts? The impact of temporary employment on leaving the parental home in Poland," Working Papers 44, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
  2. Ribar, David C., 2013. "Is Leaving Home a Hardship?," IZA Discussion Papers 7290, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Deborah A. Cobb-Clark & David C. Ribar, 2009. "Financial Stress, Family Conflict, and Youths’ Successful Transition to Adult Roles," CEPR Discussion Papers 627, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  4. Deborah Cobb-Clark & David Ribar, 2012. "Financial stress, family relationships, and Australian youths’ transitions from home and school," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 469-490, December.
  5. Delbosc, Alexa, 2013. "Household composition and within-household car saturation in Melbourne," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 94-100.
  6. Louis Christofides & Michael Hoy & Ling Yang, 2009. "The Gender Imbalance in Participation in Canadian Universities (1977-2005)," CESifo Working Paper Series 2791, CESifo Group Munich.
  7. Cobb-Clark, Deborah A. & Gorgens, Tue, 2012. "Parents' Economic Support of Young-Adult Children: Do Socioeconomic Circumstances Matter?," IZA Discussion Papers 6376, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Regina Flake, 2012. "Multigenerational Living Arrangements among Migrants," Ruhr Economic Papers 0366, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
  9. Christofides, Louis N. & Hoy, Michael & Yang, Ling, 2010. "Participation in Canadian Universities: The gender imbalance (1977-2005)," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 400-410, June.
  10. Deborah Cobb-Clark & Tue Gørgens, 2014. "Parents’ economic support of young-adult children: do socioeconomic circumstances matter?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 447-471, April.

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