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Low Skill Employment and the Changing Economy of Rural America

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Author Info

  • Gibbs, Robert
  • Kusmin, Lorin D.

Abstract

This study reports trends in rural low-skill employment in the 1990s and their impact on the rural workforce. The share of rural jobs classified as low-skill fell by 2.2 percentage points between 1990 and 2000, twice the decline of the urban low-skill employment share, but much less than the decline of the 1980s. Employment shifts from low-skill to skilled occupations within industries, rather than changes in industry mix, explain virtually all of the decline in the rural low-skill employment share. The share decline was particularly large for rural Black women, many of whom moved out of low-skill blue-collar work into service occupations, while the share of rural Hispanics who held low-skill jobs increased.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/33595
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service in its series Economic Research Report with number 33595.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:33595

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Keywords: rural labor markets; low-skill employment; job skills; human capital; industry; occupation; economic development; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Labor and Human Capital;

References

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  1. Timothy R. Wojan, 2000. "The Composition of Rural Employment Growth in the “New Economy”," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 82(3), pages 594-605.
  2. Edward L. Glaeser & David C. Mare, 1994. "Cities and Skills," NBER Working Papers 4728, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. repec:fth:stanho:e-94-11 is not listed on IDEAS
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Cited by:
  1. Du, Xiaodong & Hennessy, David A. & Edwards, William M., 2008. "Determinants of Iowa Cropland Cash Rental Rates: Testing Ricardian Rent Theory," 2008 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2008, Orlando, Florida 6355, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  2. Marre, Alexander W., 2009. "Rural Out-Migration, Income, and Poverty: Are Those Who Move Truly Better Off?," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49346, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  3. Brian C. Briggeman, 2011. "The importance of off-farm income to servicing farm debt," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q I.

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