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Elements Of Skill: Traits, Intelligences, Education, And Agglomeration

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  • Marigee Bacolod
  • Bernardo S. Blum
  • William C. Strange

Abstract

There are many fundamental issues in regional and urban economics that hinge on worker skills. This paper builds on psychological approaches to learning to characterize the role of education and agglomeration in the skill development process. While the standard approach of equating skill to worker education can be useful, there are important aspects of skill that are missed. Using a measure of skill derived from hedonic attribution, the paper explores the geographic distribution of worker traits, intelligences, and skills and considers the roles of urbanization and education in the skill development process. Copyright (c) 2009, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Journal of Regional Science.

Volume (Year): 50 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 245-280

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Handle: RePEc:bla:jregsc:v:50:y:2010:i:1:p:245-280

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Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0022-4146

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Cited by:
  1. Monica Andini & Guido de Blasio & Gilles Duranton & William C. Strange, 2013. "Marshallian labor market pooling: evidence from Italy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 922, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  2. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Duranton, Gilles & Gobillon, Laurent & Roux, Sébastien, 2012. "Sorting and local wage and skill distributions in France," CEPR Discussion Papers 8920, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. John V. Winters, 2013. "Human capital externalities and employment differences across metropolitan areas of the USA," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(5), pages 799-822, September.
  4. Fredrik Carlsen & Kare Johansen & Lasse Sigbjorn Stambol, 2011. "Effects of Regional Labour Markets on Migration Flows, by Education Level," ERSA conference papers ersa10p693, European Regional Science Association.
  5. Suzanne Kok, 2013. "Town and city jobs: Your job is different in another location," CPB Discussion Paper 246, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  6. Andini, Monica & de Blasio, Guido & Duranton, Gilles & Strange, William C., 2013. "Marshallian labour market pooling: Evidence from Italy," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(6), pages 1008-1022.

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