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An Inertia Model for the Adoption of New Farming Practices

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  • Anastasiadis, Simon
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    Abstract

    Nutrient emissions from agricultural land are now widely recognized as one of the key contributors to poor water quality in local lakes, rivers and streams. Nutrient trading has been suggested as a regulatory tool to improve and protect water quality. However, farmers’ attitudes suggest that they are resistant to making the changes required under such a scheme. This paper develops a model of farmers’ resistance to change and their adoption of new management practices under nutrient trading regulation. We specify resistance as a bound on the adoption of new practices and allow this bound to relax as farmers’ resistance to change weakens. This paper reflects current work in progress as part of the author’s Master’s Thesis. Future work will extend and build upon the material presented here. We request that readers refer to this paper only in the absence of a more recent version. This paper has been prepared for the purposes of the New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society conference August 2012.

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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/136038
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society in its series 2012 Conference, August 31, 2012, Nelson, New Zealand with number 136038.

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    Date of creation: Aug 2012
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:nzar12:136038

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    Web page: http://www.nzares.org.nz/
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    Related research

    Keywords: agriculture; inertia; mitigation; nutrient trading; technology adoption; Agribusiness; Environmental Economics and Policy; Farm Management; Land Economics/Use; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

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    1. Connor, Jeffery D. & Ward, John & Clifton, Craig & Proctor, Wendy & Hatton MacDonald, Darla, 2008. "Designing, testing and implementing a trial dryland salinity credit trade scheme," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(4), pages 574-588, November.
    2. Berger, Thomas, 2001. "Agent-based spatial models applied to agriculture: a simulation tool for technology diffusion, resource use changes and policy analysis," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(2-3), pages 245-260, September.
    3. Mark Rosenzweig & Andrew D. Foster, . "Learning by Doing and Learning from Others: Human Capital and Technical Change in Agriculture," Home Pages _068, University of Pennsylvania.
    4. Jonathan Skinner & Douglas Staiger, 2007. "Technology Adoption from Hybrid Corn to Beta-Blockers," NBER Chapters, in: Hard-to-Measure Goods and Services: Essays in Honor of Zvi Griliches, pages 545-570 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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