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Accounting for Chinese Trade: Some National and Regional Considerations

In: Geography and Ownership as Bases for Economic Accounting

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  • K. C. Fung

Abstract

China's trade has three features: high incidence of re-exports through Hong Kong, high degree of trade related to foreign investment, and large amount of `illegal' trade. Re-exports occur when imports to Hong Kong are consigned to a buyer in Hong Kong, who adds a markup, and exports the goods elsewhere without fundamentally changing the goods. Using U.S. data and accounting for re-exports, the U.S.-China trade balance has to be lowered by 35 percent. Foreign investments in China accounted for 45 percent of China's exports. Foreign investments include foreign direct investment (FDI) and foreign subcontracting. `Illegal' trade between China and Taiwan has been induced by Taiwan's `no direct trade' policy. Illegal trade such as smuggling and tariff evasion also affect China's trade with her other trading partners.

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This chapter was published in:

  • Robert E. Baldwin & Robert E. Lipsey & J. David Richards, 1998. "Geography and Ownership as Bases for Economic Accounting," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number bald98-1, October.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 6820.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:6820

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    References

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    1. Marcus Noland, 1995. "China and the International Economic System," Working Paper Series WP95-6, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    2. Magnus Blomstrom & Irving B. Kravis & Robert E. Lipsey, 1988. "Multinational Firms and Manufactured Exports from Developing Countries," NBER Working Papers 2493, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Robert E. Baldwin & Douglas Nelson, 1993. "The Political Economy of U.S.-Taiwanese Trade and Other International Economic Relations," NBER Chapters, in: Trade and Protectionism, NBER-EASE Volume 2, pages 307-337 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:
    1. Robert C. Feenstra & Wen Hai & Wing T. Woo & Shunli Yao, . "The U.S.-China Bilateral Trade Balance: It'S Size And Determinants," Department of Economics 98-09, California Davis - Department of Economics.
    2. Xiaohui Liu & Chang Shu, 2003. "Determinants of Export Performance: Evidence from Chinese Industries," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 45-67, March.
    3. Fung, K. C., 2005. "Trade and Investment among China, the United States, and the Asia-Pacific Economies: An Invited Testimony to the U.S. Congressional Commission," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt15x564x2, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
    4. Wang, Zhi & Gehlhar, Mark & Yao, Shunli, 2010. "A globally consistent framework for reliability-based trade statistics reconciliation in the presence of an entrepôt," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 161-189, March.
    5. Zhi Wang & Mark Gehlhar & Shunli Yao, 2007. "A Globally Consistent Framework for Reliability-based Trade Statistics Reconciliation in the Presence of an Entrepôt," Trade Working Papers 22715, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    6. Noland, Marcus, 1996. "Trade, investment, and economic conflict between the United States and Asia," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 435-458.
    7. Robert C. Feenstra, 1999. "Discrepancies in International Data: An Application to China-Hong Kong Entrepot Trade," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 338-343, May.
    8. Fernald, John & Edison, Hali & Loungani, Prakash, 1999. "Was China the first domino? Assessing links between China and other Asian economies," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 515-535, August.
    9. Gerald Epstein & Elissa Braunstein, 2002. "Bargaining Power and Foreign Direct Investment in China: Can 1.3 Billion Consumers Tame the Multinationals?," Working Papers wp45, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    10. Robert C. Feenstra & Robert E. Lipsey & Harry P. Bowen, 1997. "World Trade Flows, 1970-1992, with Production and Tariff Data," NBER Working Papers 5910, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Jeroen Hinloopen & Charles van Marrewijk, 2004. "Dynamics of Chinese Comparative Advantage," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 04-034/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    12. John Fernald & Hali Edison & Prakash Loungani, 1998. "Was China the first domino? assessing links between China and the rest of emerging Asia," International Finance Discussion Papers 604, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

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