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China and the International Economic System

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  • Marcus Noland

    ()
    (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

Abstract

Since the inception of economic reforms in 1979, China's economic performance has been nothing short of spectacular. Between 1979 and 1994, China's real growth rate has averaged more than 9 percent annually. Agriculture has been decollectivized, the management of state-controlled firms has been decentralized, and property rights reforms have facilitated an explosion of businesses outside central government control. Goods and factor markets have been liberalized to a significant extent: most prices are now determined by markets, state control of labor markets has been reduced, and previously repressed capital markets have experienced rapid, if uneven, development. China nevertheless retains a significant state-owned sector, and problems associated with lack of reform in this sector, combined with the relatively primitive nature of macroeconomic policy instruments, has lead to a stop-start pattern of growth and problems with inflation. The time path of Chinese economic growth is subject to considerable uncertainty.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Peterson Institute for International Economics in its series Working Paper Series with number WP95-6.

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Date of creation: 1995
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Handle: RePEc:iie:wpaper:wp95-6

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Cited by:
  1. Park, Donghyun & Shin, Kwanho, 2009. "Can Trade with the People’s Republic of China be an Engine of Growth for Developing Asia?," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 172, Asian Development Bank.
  2. Athukorala, Prema-chandra, 2010. "Production Networks and Trade Patterns in East Asia: Regionalization or Globalization?," Working Papers on Regional Economic Integration 56, Asian Development Bank.
  3. Ramkishen Rajan, 1996. "Measures of intra-industry trade reconsidered with reference to Singapore’s bilateral trade with Japan and the United States," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 132(2), pages 378-389, September.
  4. Takatoshi Ito & Satoshi Koibuchi & Kiyotaka Sato & Junko Shimizu, 2010. "Why has the yen failed to become a dominant invoicing currency in Asia? A firm-level analysis of Japanese Exporters' invoicing behavior," NBER Working Papers 16231, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Park, Donghyun & Shin, Kwanho, 2009. "The People’s Republic of China as an Engine of Growth for Developing Asia? Evidence from Vector Autoregression Models," ADB Economics Working Paper Series 175, Asian Development Bank.
  6. ITO Takatoshi & KOIBUCHI Satoshi & SATO Kiyotaka & SHIMIZU Junko, 2010. "Determinants of Currency Invoicing in Japanese Exports: A firm-level analysis," Discussion papers 10034, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
  7. Prema-chandra Athukorala, 2008. "Trade and Investment Patterns in Asia : Regionalisation or Globalisation?," EABER Working Papers 21794, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  8. Prema-chandra Athukorala, 2013. "Global production sharing and trade patterns in East Asia," Departmental Working Papers 2013-10, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
  9. Roger Farrell, 2000. "Japanese Foreign Direct Investment in the World Economy 1951-1997," Asia Pacific Economic Papers 299, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  10. K.C. Fung, 1996. "Accounting for Chinese Trade: Some National and Regional Considerations," NBER Working Papers 5595, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Prema-chandra Athukorala, 2003. "Product Fragmentation and Trade Patterns in East Asia," Departmental Working Papers 2003-21, The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics.
  12. DeRosa, Dean A., 1997. "Agricultural trade and rural development in the Middle East and North Africa: recent developments and prospects," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1732, The World Bank.

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