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The Role and Impact of Public-Private Partnerships in Education

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Author Info

  • Harry Anthony Patrinos
  • Felipe Barrera-Osorio
  • Juliana Guaqueta

Abstract

The book examines five ways through which public-private contracts can help countries meet education goals. First, public-private partnerships can increase access to good quality education for all, especially for poor children who live in remote, underserved communities and for children in minority populations. Second, lessons for innovative means of financing education can be particularly helpful in post-conflict countries undergoing reconstruction. Third, lessons about what works in terms of public-private partnerships contribute to the development of a more differentiated business model especially for middle-income countries. Fourth, the challenge of meeting the education Millennium Development Goals in less than a decade is a daunting one in the poorest countries. Understanding new partnership arrangements within a broad international aid architecture in education can help bring us closer to those goals. Fifth, some very innovative public-private partnership arrangements are happening in Arab countries, and lessons can be drawn from their experience.

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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 2612 and published in 2009.

ISBN: 978-0-8213-7866-3
Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:2612

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Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
Phone: (202) 477-1234
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Web page: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org
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Related research

Keywords: Education - Education For All Tertiary Education Teaching and Learning Education - Primary Education;

References

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Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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  1. Bernardita Vial & Claudio Sapelli, 2004. "Peer Effects And Relative Performance Of Voucher Schools In Chile," Econometric Society 2004 Latin American Meetings, Econometric Society 96, Econometric Society.
  2. Bettinger, Eric P., 2005. "The effect of charter schools on charter students and public schools," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 133-147, April.
  3. Gauri, Varun & Vawda, Ayesha, 2003. "Vouchers for basic education in developing countries : a principal-agent perspective," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 3005, The World Bank.
  4. Helen F. Ladd, 2002. "School Vouchers: A Critical View," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 16(4), pages 3-24, Fall.
  5. Randall K. Filer & Daniel Munich, 2000. "Responses of Private and Public Schools to Voucher Funding:The Czech and Hungarian Experience," CERGE-EI Working Papers, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague wp160, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague.
  6. Sakellariou, Chris & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2004. "Incidence analysis of public support to the private education sector in Cote d'Ivoire," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 3231, The World Bank.
  7. Robert Bifulco & Helen F. Ladd, 2006. "The Impacts of Charter Schools on Student Achievement: Evidence from North Carolina," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 1(1), pages 50-90, January.
  8. Eric A. Hanushek, 2002. "The Failure of Input-based Schooling Policies," NBER Working Papers, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc 9040, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Kang, Changhui, 2007. "Classroom peer effects and academic achievement: Quasi-randomization evidence from South Korea," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 458-495, May.
  10. Alejandra Mizala & Pilar Romaguera, 2000. "School Performance and Choice: The Chilean Experience," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(2), pages 392-417.
  11. Rajashri Chakrabarti & Paul E. Peterson (ed.), 2008. "School Choice International: Exploring Public-Private Partnerships," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262033763, December.
  12. Blomqvist, Ake & Jimenez, Emmanuel, 1989. "The public role in private post-secondary education : a review of issues and options," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 240, The World Bank.
  13. Efraim Sadka, 2006. "Public-Private Partnerships," IMF Working Papers, International Monetary Fund 06/77, International Monetary Fund.
  14. Sosale, Shobhana, 2000. "Trends in private sector development in World Bank education projects," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 2452, The World Bank.
  15. Booker, Kevin & Gilpatric, Scott M. & Gronberg, Timothy & Jansen, Dennis, 2008. "The effect of charter schools on traditional public school students in Texas: Are children who stay behind left behind?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 123-145, July.
  16. Harry Anthony Patrinos & Shobhana Sosale, 2007. "Mobilizing the Private Sector for Public Education : A View from the Trenches," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, The World Bank, number 6756, February.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. MacLeod, W. Bentley & Urquiola, Miguel, 2012. "Competition and Educational Productivity: Incentives Writ Large," IZA Discussion Papers, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) 7063, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Lisa Grazzini & Alessandro Petretto, 2013. "Health and Education: Challenges and Financial Constraints," Working Papers - Economics, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa wp2013_19.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
  3. M. Manacorda & F.C. Rosati, 2008. "Industrial structure and child labour. Evidence from Brazil," UCW Working Paper, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme) 44, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
  4. Leonard, David K. & Bloom, Gerald & Hanson, Kara & O’Farrell, Juan & Spicer, Neil, 2013. "Institutional Solutions to the Asymmetric Information Problem in Health and Development Services for the Poor," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 71-87.

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