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Social funds: evidence on targeting, impacts and sustainability

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  • Julie van Domelen

    (Social Protection Unit, Human Development Network, World Bank, Wishington DC, USA)

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    Abstract

    Impact evaluations show that social fund resources are pro-poor, and that targeting has improved over time. Despite the leakage which occurs to better-off areas and households, social fund performance compares favorably with other public programmes. Investments largely reflect community needs and priorities and have increased access to, quality and utilization of basic social infrastructure. These benefits have generally translated into improvements in the health and education status of households, though specific impacts vary by country, region, and sector. The vast majority of facilities are operating several years after completion, but long-term sustainability of water systems is particularly problematic given insufficient cost recovery. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.900
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

    Volume (Year): 14 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 5 ()
    Pages: 627-642

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:14:y:2002:i:5:p:627-642

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    Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home

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    1. Owen, Daniel & Van Domelen, Julie, 1998. "Getting an earful : a review of beneficiary assessments of social funds," Social Protection Discussion Papers 20112, The World Bank.
    2. Newman, John & Jorgensen, Steen & Pradhan, Menno, 1991. "How Did Workers Benefit from Bolivia's Emergency Social Fund?," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 5(2), pages 367-93, May.
    3. Jorgensen, Steen Lau & Van Domelen, Julie, 1999. "Helping the poor manage risk better : the role of social funds," Social Protection Discussion Papers 21333, The World Bank.
    4. Paxson, Christina & Schady, Norbert, 1999. "Do school facilities matter? : the case of the Peruvian Social Fund (FONCODES)," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2229, The World Bank.
    5. John Newman & Menno Pradhan & Laura B. Rawlings & Geert Ridder & Ramiro Coa & Jose Luis Evia, 2002. "An Impact Evaluation of Education, Health, and Water Supply Investments by the Bolivian Social Investment Fund," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 16(2), pages 241-274, August.
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    Cited by:
    1. Araujo, M. Caridad & Ferreira, Francisco H.G. & Lanjouw, Peter & Özler, Berk, 2008. "Local inequality and project choice: Theory and evidence from Ecuador," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(5-6), pages 1022-1046, June.
    2. Labonne, Julien & Chase, Robert S., 2009. "Who is at the Wheel When Communities Drive Development? Evidence from the Philippines," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 219-231, January.
    3. Jean-Paul Faguet & Frank-Borge Wietzke, 2006. "Social funds and decentralisation: optimal institutional design," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2395, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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