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How Did Workers Benefit from Bolivia's Emergency Social Fund?

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  • Newman, John
  • Jorgensen, Steen
  • Pradhan, Menno

Abstract

Bolivia's Emergency Social Fund (ESF) was established to cushion the adverse effects on the poor of the economic crisis and subsequent stabilization program in the 1980s and to facilitate transition through the phases of structural adjustment. The ESF provided temporary employment opportunities by funding small-scale, labor-intensive projects that were proposed by local governmental and nongovernmental organizations. This article measures the impact of the ESF program on employment and income of workers in the ESF projects. For the average ESF worker, hourly wages were 12.8 percent higher, the work week was 9.5 hours longer, and weekly earnings were 32 percent higher than what they would have been without the ESF. Taking into account the probability that the individual may not have worked without the ESF leads to larger gains. The greatest benefits from participating in the program were received by those who would have been least well-off without it. Copyright 1991 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by World Bank Group in its journal World Bank Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 5 (1991)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 367-93

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Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:5:y:1991:i:2:p:367-93

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Cited by:
  1. Margaret E. Grosh & Paul Glewwe, 1998. "Data Watch: The World Bank's Living Standards Measurement Study Household Surveys," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 187-196, Winter.
  2. Reynaldo Marconi & Paul Mosley, 2006. "Bolivia during the global crisis 1998-2004: towards a 'macroeconomics of microfinance'," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 237-261.
  3. Anne Maasland, 1992. "Consecuencias Distributivas de las Políticas de Ajuste: Una Revisión de Metodologías," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 29(86), pages 141-162.
  4. Luis Marcano, 2005. "Atacando pobreza: Evaluación del programa Fondo de inversión social de Panamá," IDB Publications 27339, Inter-American Development Bank.
  5. Julie van Domelen, 2002. "Social funds: evidence on targeting, impacts and sustainability," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(5), pages 627-642.
  6. Maasland, Anne, 1990. "Methods for measuring the effect of adjustment policies on income distribution," Policy Research Working Paper Series 474, The World Bank.
  7. Carmen Velasco & Reynaldo Marconi, 2004. "Group dynamics, gender and microfinance in Bolivia," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 519-528.
  8. Haddad, Lawrence & Brown, Lynn R. & Richter, Andrea & Smith, Lisa, 1995. "The gender dimensions of economic adjustment policies: Potential interactions and evidence to date," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 881-896, June.

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