Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Competition and supplier-induced demand in a health care system with fixed fees

Contents:

Author Info

  • Rune J. S�rensen

    (Norwegian School of Management, Sandvika, Norway)

  • Jostein Grytten

    (University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The present paper examines whether supplier-induced demand exists for primary physician services in Norway. The research design is adapted to the institutional setting of Norwegian primary physician services, where there is a fixed fee schedule. More than 50% of primary care physicians receive a payment for treatment from the National Insurance Administration on a fee-for-item basis. The results showed that increased competition, measured as a high physician:population ratio, led to a decline in the number of consultations per contract physician. However, the contract physicians in high physician density areas did not compensate for the lack of patients by providing more items of treatment in order to maintain their income. Contract physicians' revenue from items of treatment per consultation were unaffected both by physician density and by the number of consultations per contract physician. These results are further corroborated by data that showed that contract physicians' gross revenue and profits were declining functions of physician density. This paper argues that, from an efficiency point of view, a deregulated health care market with fixed fees may operate well. Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

    Download Info

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 8 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 6 ()
    Pages: 497-508

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:8:y:1999:i:6:p:497-508

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Kathryn M. Langwell, 1982. "Factors Affecting the Incomes of Men and Women Physicians: Further Explorations," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(2), pages 261-275.
    2. Grytten, Jostein & Carlsen, Fredrik & Sorensen, Rune, 1995. "Supplier inducement in a public health care system," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 207-229, June.
    3. Birch, Stephen, 1988. "The identification of supplier-inducement in a fixed price system of health care provision : The case of dentistry in the United Kingdom," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 129-150, June.
    4. Fredrik Carlsen & Jostein Grytten, 1998. "More physicians: improved availability or induced demand?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(6), pages 495-508.
    5. Stano, Miron, 1985. "An analysis of the evidence on competition in the physician services markets," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 197-211, September.
    6. Dranove, David & Wehner, Paul, 1994. "Physician-induced demand for childbirths," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 61-73, March.
    7. Cromwell, Jerry & Mitchell, Janet B., 1986. "Physician-induced demand for surgery," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(4), pages 293-313, December.
    8. Victor R. Fuchs, 1978. "The Supply of Surgeons and the Demand for Operations," NBER Working Papers 0236, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Shinya Sugawara & Jiro Nakamura, 2014. "Incentive for Gatekeepers and Their Demand Inducement: An Empirical Analysis of Care Managers in the Japanese Long-Term Care Insurance," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-916, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    2. Eric Delattre & Brigitte Dormont, 2003. "Fixed fees and physician-induced demand: A panel data study on French physicians," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(9), pages 741-754.
    3. Christian Schmid, 2013. "Identification of Supplier-induced Demand What kind of consumer information matters?," Diskussionsschriften dp1301, Universitaet Bern, Departement Volkswirtschaft.
    4. Jostein Grytten & Rune S�rensen, 2000. "Competition and dental services," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(5), pages 447-461.
    5. repec:hal:cesptp:halshs-00305309 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Bernard Fortin & Nicolas Jacquemet & Bruce Shearer, 2008. "Policy Analysis in the Health-Services Market: Accounting for Quality and Quantity," Cahiers de recherche 0807, CIRPEE.
    7. Grytten, Jostein & Sorensen, Rune, 2001. "Type of contract and supplier-induced demand for primary physicians in Norway," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 379-393, May.
    8. Jostein Grytten & Fredrik Carlsen & Irene Skau, 2008. "Primary physicians’ response to changes in fees," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 117-125, May.
    9. Grytten, Jostein & Sorensen, Rune, 2003. "Practice variation and physician-specific effects," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 403-418, May.
    10. Léonard, Christian & Stordeur, Sabine & Roberfroid, Dominique, 2009. "Association between physician density and health care consumption: A systematic review of the evidence," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 121-134, July.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:8:y:1999:i:6:p:497-508. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.