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Does More Schooling Make Women Better Nourished and Healthier? Adult Sibling Random and Fixed Effects Estimates for Nicaragua

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  • Jere R. Behrman
  • Barbara L. Wolfe

Abstract

There is debate on whether schooling causes increases in productivity or whether the estimated relationships reflect ability, knowledge, tastes etc., that are associated with schooling. This paper examines the impact of women's schooling on women's health and nutrition with and without controls for unobserved childhood background factors related to ability and motivation. Random and fixed effects models are estimated using data on adult sisters. Both sets of estimates reinforce the relationships found in standard estimates-that women's schooling positively affects their health and nutrient intakes; the latter result is particularly robust.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 24 (1989)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 644-663

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:24:y:1989:i:4:p:644-663

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Chiara Pronzato, 2009. "An Examination of Paternal and Maternal Intergenerational Transmission of Schooling," CHILD Working Papers wp20_09, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
  2. Emily Oster & Rebecca Thornton, 2011. "Menstruation, Sanitary Products, and School Attendance: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(1), pages 91-100, January.
  3. Jason Fletcher, 2012. "The Effects of First Occupation on Long Term Health Status: Evidence from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 49-75, March.
  4. Handa, Sudhanshu, 1998. "Gender and life-cycle differences in the impact of schooling on chronic disease in Jamaica," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 325-336, June.
  5. Joop Hartog & Hessel Oosterbeek, 1997. "Health, Wealth and Happiness: Why pursue a Higher Education?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 97-034/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  6. Jere Behrman & Hans-Peter Kohler & Vibeke Jensen & Dorthe Pedersen & Inge Petersen & Paul Bingley & Kaare Christensen, 2011. "Does More Schooling Reduce Hospitalization and Delay Mortality? New Evidence Based on Danish Twins," Demography, Springer, vol. 48(4), pages 1347-1375, November.
  7. repec:dgr:uvatin:2097034 is not listed on IDEAS
  8. Chiara Pronzato, 2008. "Why educated mothers don't make educated children: A statistical study in the intergenerational transmission of schooling," Working Papers 005, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
  9. Gilleskie, Donna B. & Harrison, Amy L., 1998. "The effect of endogenous health inputs on the relationship between health and education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 279-295, June.
  10. Arendt, Jacob Nielsen, 2005. "Does education cause better health? A panel data analysis using school reforms for identification," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 149-160, April.
  11. Jere R. Behrman & Hans-Peter Kohler & Susan Cotts Watkins, 2001. "How can we measure the causal effects of social networks using observational data? Evidence from the diffusion of family planning and AIDS worries in South Nyanza District, Kenya," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-022, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  12. Jere R. Behrman, 1996. "Human capital formation, returns and policies: Analytical approaches and research questions," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 341-373.
  13. Groot, Wim & Maassen van den Brink, Henriette, 2007. "The health effects of education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 186-200, April.
  14. Kathryn Anderson & James Foster & David Frisvold, 2004. "Investing in Health: The Long-Term Impact of Head Start," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 0426, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
  15. Joop Hartog & Hessel Oosterbeek, 1997. "Health, Wealth and Happiness: Why pursue a Higher Education?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 97-034/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  16. repec:ese:iserwp:2008-11 is not listed on IDEAS

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