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The Expanding Workweek? Understanding Trends in Long Work Hours among U.S. Men, 1979-2006

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  • Peter Kuhn
  • Fernando Lozano

Abstract

According to U.S. Census and Current Population Survey (CPS) data, employed U.S. men are more likely to work more than 48 hours per week today than 25 years ago. Using 1979-2006 CPS data, we show that this increase was greatest in the 1980s, among highly educated, highly paid, and older men, and among workers paid on a salaried basis. We examine some possible explanations for these changes, including composition effects. Among salaried men, increases in long work hours were greatest in detailed occupations and industries with larger increases in residual wage inequality and slowly growing real compensation at "standard" (40) hours. (c) 2008 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved..

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 26 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (04)
Pages: 311-343

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:26:y:2008:i:2:p:311-343

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Cited by:
  1. Julien Champagne & André Kurmann, 2010. "The Great Increase in Relative Volatility of Real Wages in the United States," Cahiers de recherche 1010, CIRPEE.
  2. Lozano, Fernando A., 2009. "The Flexibility of the Workweek in the United States: Evidence from the FIFA World Cup," IZA Discussion Papers 4217, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Lozano, Fernando A., 2009. "Understanding the Workweek of Foreign Born Workers in the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 4317, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Gustavsson, Magnus, 2013. "Permanent versus Transitory Wage Differentials and the Inequality-Hours Hypothesis," Working Paper Series, Center for Labor Studies 2013:12, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  5. Cervellati, Matteo & Esteban, Joan & Kranich, Laurence, 2010. "Work values, endogenous sentiments redistribution," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(9-10), pages 612-627, October.
  6. Gary Charness & Peter Kuhn & Marie-Claire Villeval, 2008. "Competition and the Ratchet Effect," Working Papers 0828, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure.
  7. Card, David & Heining, Jörg & Kline, Patrick, 2013. "Workplace Heterogeneity and the Rise of West German Wage Inequality," IZA Discussion Papers 7200, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Peter Flaschel & Alfred Greiner & Camille Logeay & Christian Proano, 2012. "Employment cycles, low income work and the dynamic impact of wage regulations. A macro perspective," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 235-250, April.
  9. Ricardo Manuel Santos, . "Dynamic Effects of Labor Supply: a mechanism explaining cross-sectional differences in hours," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics.
  10. Champagne, Julien & Kurmann, André, 2013. "The great increase in relative wage volatility in the United States," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 166-183.
  11. Lei Fang & Guozhong Zhu, 2012. "Home production technology and time allocation: empirics, theory, and implications," Working Paper 2012-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  12. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2010. "Comment on "Recent Trends in Compensation Inequality"," NBER Chapters, in: Labor in the New Economy, pages 98-100 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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