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The economics profession, the financial crisis, and method

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  • David Colander

Abstract

In 2007-2008, the world economy came perilously close to a systemic failure in which a financial system collapse almost undermined the entire world economy as we know it. These events have led some to fault the economics profession for its failure to predict the crisis, and to ask whether the crisis will lead the economics profession to change its ways. In this paper, I will discuss these two issues, and then turn to some suggestions for institutional changes in the economics profession that might lead to better outcomes in the future.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1350178X.2010.525039
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Journal of Economic Methodology.

Volume (Year): 17 (2010)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 419-427

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Handle: RePEc:taf:jecmet:v:17:y:2010:i:4:p:419-427

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Related research

Keywords: DSGE; complexity; macroeconomic complexity; method; interpretative research; incentives; representative researcher;

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References

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  1. Colander, David C., 2009. "Economists, incentives, judgment, and the European CVAR approach to macroeconometrics," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy, vol. 3(9), pages 1-21.
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Cited by:
  1. Giancarlo Bertocco, 2011. "Finance and risk: does finance create risk?," Economics and Quantitative Methods qf1115, Department of Economics, University of Insubria.
  2. Chen, Shu-Heng & Chang, Chia-Ling & Tseng, Yi-Heng, 2014. "Social networks, social interaction and macroeconomic dynamics: How much could Ernst Ising help DSGE?," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 312-335.
  3. Giancarlo Bertocco, 2011. "Housing bubble and economic theory: is mainstream theory able to explain the crisis?," Economics and Quantitative Methods qf1116, Department of Economics, University of Insubria.
  4. Hanappi, Hardy, 2011. "Signs of reality - reality of signs. Explorations of a pending revolution in political economy," MPRA Paper 31570, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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