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Science, Social Networks and Spillovers

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  • Olav Sorenson
  • Jasjit Singh

Abstract

Although prior empirical research has established an association between science and the widespread diffusion of knowledge, the exact mechanism(s) through which science catalyses information flow remains somewhat ambiguous. This paper investigates whether the knowledge diffusion associated with science-based innovation stems from the norm of openness and incentives for publication, or whether scientists maintain more extensive and dispersed social networks that facilitate the dissemination of tacit knowledge. Our analysis supports the first mechanism: we track the movement of knowledge with patent citations, and find that science-based innovations diffuse more rapidly and widely, even after controlling for the underlying social networks of researchers as measured using information on prior collaborations. We also find that publication and social networks act as substitutes in the diffusion of knowledge.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Industry and Innovation.

Volume (Year): 14 (2007)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 219-238

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Handle: RePEc:taf:indinn:v:14:y:2007:i:2:p:219-238

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Related research

Keywords: Science; publication; social networks; diffusion; spillovers;

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Cited by:
  1. Tom Broekel & Ron Boschma, 2009. "Knowledge networks in the Dutch aviation industry: the proximity paradox," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 0915, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Oct 2009.
  2. F. Quatraro & S. Usai, 2014. "Are knowledge flows all alike? Evidence from European regions," Working Paper CRENoS 201405, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
  3. Dornbusch, Friedrich & Brenner, Thomas, 2013. "Universities as local knowledge hubs under different technology regimes: New evidence from academic patenting," Working Papers "Firms and Region" R6/2013, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
  4. Friedrich Dornbusch & Thomas Brenner, 2013. "Universities as local knowledge hubs under different technology regimes – New evidence from academic patenting," Working Papers on Innovation and Space 2013-10, Philipps University Marburg, Department of Geography.
  5. Uwe Cantner & Andreas Meder, 2007. "Technological proximity and the choice of cooperation partner," Journal of Economic Interaction and Coordination, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 45-65, June.

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