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The diffusion of IT in higher education: publishing productivity of academic life scientists

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Author Info

  • Anne Winkler
  • Sharon Levin
  • Paula Stephan

Abstract

This study investigates how the diffusion of Internet access and other advancements in IT across a broad group of institutions of higher education has affected the publishing productivity of life scientists. Several IT indicators are considered: (1) the adoption of BITNET; (2) the registration of domain names (DNS); (3) the availability of the electronic journal database, JSTOR (http://www.jstor.org/), and (4) the availability of electronic library resources. Data on life scientists are from the 1983, 1995, 2001 and 2003 Survey of Doctorate Recipients (SDR). Educational institutions are classified into tiers depending upon research intensity. Three hypotheses are tested: (1) IT enhances the careers of faculty; (2) IT improves the careers of faculty at lower-tiered relative to higher-tiered institutions; and (3) IT increases women's publication rates relative to those of men. The results provide some support for the first two hypotheses but no support for the third hypothesis.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Economics of Innovation and New Technology.

Volume (Year): 19 (2010)
Issue (Month): 5 ()
Pages: 481-503

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Handle: RePEc:taf:ecinnt:v:19:y:2010:i:5:p:481-503

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Related research

Keywords: diffusion; technology; life sciences; professional labour markets; gender;

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Cited by:
  1. Daniel Johnson & Kristina Lybecker, 2012. "Does Distance Matter Less Now? The Changing Role of Geography in Biotechnology Innovation," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, vol. 40(1), pages 21-35, February.
  2. Chris Forman & Nicolas van Zeebroeck, 2012. "From Wires to Partners: How the Internet Has Fostered R&D Collaborations Within Firms," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 58(8), pages 1549-1568, August.
  3. Ding, Waverly W. & Levin, Sharon G. & Stephan, Paula E. & Winkler, Ann E., 2009. "The Impact of Information Technology on Scientists’ Productivity, Quality and Collaboration Patterns," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt80n3512q, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
  4. Grant C. Black & Paula E. Stephan, 2010. "The Economics of University Science and the Role of Foreign Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Scholars," NBER Chapters, in: American Universities in a Global Market, pages 129-161 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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