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How sensitive are Malaysia's bilateral trade flows to depreciation?

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  • Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee
  • Hanafiah Harvey

Abstract

In an attempt to assess the impact of currency depreciation on the trade balance, recent studies are employing disaggregated trade data to avoid aggregation bias. However, since import and export prices are not available at disaggregated level, recent studies are using export and import values rather than their volumes so that they can establish direct relation between inpayments and the exchange rate as well as between outpayments and the exchange rate. This study explores the experience of Malaysia. Bilateral inpayments and outpayments models are estimated between Malaysia and her 14 trading partners using quarterly data and bound testing approach to cointegration. The results show that while real depreciation of the ringgit has short-run effects, in the long-run it increases Malaysia's inpayments from only five trading partners.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 38 (2006)
Issue (Month): 11 ()
Pages: 1279-1286

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Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:38:y:2006:i:11:p:1279-1286

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References

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  1. Bahmani-Oskooee, Mohsen & Niroomand, Farhang, 1998. "Long-run price elasticities and the Marshall-Lerner condition revisited," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 101-109, October.
  2. Nadenichek, Jon, 2000. "The Japan-US trade imbalance: a real business cycle perspective," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 255-271, September.
  3. Eaton Jonathan & Tamura Akiko, 1994. "Bilateralism and Regionalism in Japanese and U.S. Trade and Direct Foreign Investment Patterns," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 8(4), pages 478-510, December.
  4. Hakan Berument & Nergiz Dinçer, 2005. "Denomination Composition of Trade and Trade Balance : Evidence from Turkey," Departmental Working Papers 0510, Bilkent University, Department of Economics.
  5. Bahmani-Oskooee, Mohsen & Goswami, Gour Gobinda, 2004. "Exchange rate sensitivity of Japan's bilateral trade flows," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 1-15, January.
  6. Stephen Kyereme, 2002. "Determinants of United States' trade balance with Australia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(10), pages 1241-1250.
  7. Dragan Miljkovic & Rodney Paul & Roberto Garcia, 2000. "Income effects on the trade balance in small open economies," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 327-333.
  8. Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee, 2001. "Nominal and real effective exchange rates of middle eastern countries and their trade performance," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(1), pages 103-111.
  9. Swarnjit Arora & Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee & Gour Goswami, 2003. "Bilateral J-curve between India and her trading partners," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(9), pages 1037-1041.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Tang, Chor Foon & Shahbaz Shabbir, Muhammad, 2011. "Electricity consumption and economic growth nexus in Portugal using cointegration and causality approaches," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3529-3536, June.
  2. Muhammad Shahbaz & Mete Feridun, 2012. "Electricity consumption and economic growth empirical evidence from Pakistan," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 46(5), pages 1583-1599, August.
  3. Chiu, Yi-Bin & Lee, Chien-Chiang & Sun, Chia-Hung, 2010. "The U.S. trade imbalance and real exchange rate: An application of the heterogeneous panel cointegration method," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 705-716, May.
  4. Chan, Tze-Haw & Hooy, Chee-Wooi, 2011. "China-Malaysia’s long run trading and exchange rate: complementary or conflicting?," MPRA Paper 33585, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Kyophilavong, Phouphet & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Salah Uddin, Gazi, 2013. "Does J-Curve Phenomenon Exist in Case of Laos? An ARDL Approach," MPRA Paper 49052, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 12 Aug 2013.
  6. Chan, Tze-Haw & Hooy, Chee-Wooi, 2010. "China-Malaysia’s Trading and Exchange Rate: Complementary or Conflicting Features?," MPRA Paper 25546, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Hooy, Chee-Wooi & Chan, Tze-Haw, 2008. "Examining Exchange Rates Exposure, J-Curve and the Marshall-Lerner Condition for High Frequency Trade Series between China and Malaysia," MPRA Paper 10916, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 06 Oct 2008.

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