Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Stochastic volatility, smile & asymptotics

Contents:

Author Info

  • K. Ronnie Sircar
  • George Papanicolaou
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    We consider the pricing and hedging problem for options on stocks whose volatility is a random process. Traditional approaches, such as that of Hull and White, have been successful in accounting for the much observed smile curve, and the success of a large class of such models in this respect is guaranteed by a theorem of Renault and Touzi, for which we present a simplified proof. Motivated by the robustness of the smile effect to specific modelling of the unobserved volatility process, we introduce a methodology that does not depend on a particular stochastic volatility model. We start with the Black-Scholes pricing PDE with a random volatility coefficient. We identify and exploit distinct time scales of fluctuation for the stock price and volatility processes yielding an asymptotic approximation that is a Black-Scholes type price or hedging ratio plus a Gaussian random variable quantifying the risk from the uncertainty in the volatility. These lead us to translate volatility risk into pricing and hedging bands for the derivative securities, without needing to estimate the market's value of risk or to specify a parametric model for the volatility process. For some special cases, we can give explicit formulas. We outline how this method can be used to save on the cost of hedging in a random volatility environment, and run simulations demonstrating its effectiveness. The theory needs estimation of a few statistics of the volatility process, and we run experiments to obtain approximations to these from simulated stock price and smile curve data.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/135048699334573
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Mathematical Finance.

    Volume (Year): 6 (1999)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 107-145

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:taf:apmtfi:v:6:y:1999:i:2:p:107-145

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAMF20

    Order Information:
    Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/RAMF20

    Related research

    Keywords: Option Pricing; Volatility; Stochastic Volatility Models; Hedging; Smile; Curve;

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Nelson, Daniel B., 1990. "ARCH models as diffusion approximations," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1-2), pages 7-38.
    2. Harrison, J. Michael & Kreps, David M., 1979. "Martingales and arbitrage in multiperiod securities markets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 381-408, June.
    3. Ball, Clifford A. & Roma, Antonio, 1994. "Stochastic Volatility Option Pricing," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(04), pages 589-607, December.
    4. M. Avellaneda & A. Levy & A. ParAS, 1995. "Pricing and hedging derivative securities in markets with uncertain volatilities," Applied Mathematical Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(2), pages 73-88.
    5. N. Hofmann & E. Platen & M. Schweizer, 1992. "Option Pricing under Incompleteness and Stochastic Volatility," Discussion Paper Serie B 209, University of Bonn, Germany.
    6. Heston, Steven L, 1993. "A Closed-Form Solution for Options with Stochastic Volatility with Applications to Bond and Currency Options," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(2), pages 327-43.
    7. Black, Fischer & Scholes, Myron S, 1973. "The Pricing of Options and Corporate Liabilities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(3), pages 637-54, May-June.
    8. Marc Romano & Nizar Touzi, 1997. "Contingent Claims and Market Completeness in a Stochastic Volatility Model," Mathematical Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 7(4), pages 399-412.
    9. Stein, Elias M & Stein, Jeremy C, 1991. "Stock Price Distributions with Stochastic Volatility: An Analytic Approach," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 4(4), pages 727-52.
    10. Merton, Robert C., 1976. "Option pricing when underlying stock returns are discontinuous," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(1-2), pages 125-144.
    11. Eric Renault & Nizar Touzi, 1996. "Option Hedging And Implied Volatilities In A Stochastic Volatility Model," Mathematical Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(3), pages 279-302.
    12. Latane, Henry A & Rendleman, Richard J, Jr, 1976. "Standard Deviations of Stock Price Ratios Implied in Option Prices," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 31(2), pages 369-81, May.
    13. MacBeth, James D & Merville, Larry J, 1979. "An Empirical Examination of the Black-Scholes Call Option Pricing Model," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 34(5), pages 1173-86, December.
    14. Stephen J. Taylor, 1994. "Modeling Stochastic Volatility: A Review And Comparative Study," Mathematical Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(2), pages 183-204.
    15. Mark Rubinstein., 1994. "Implied Binomial Trees," Research Program in Finance Working Papers RPF-232, University of California at Berkeley.
    16. Canina, Linda & Figlewski, Stephen, 1993. "The Informational Content of Implied Volatility," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(3), pages 659-81.
    17. Hull, John C & White, Alan D, 1987. " The Pricing of Options on Assets with Stochastic Volatilities," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 42(2), pages 281-300, June.
    18. Mark. B. Garman., 1976. "A General Theory of Asset Valuation under Diffusion State Processes," Research Program in Finance Working Papers 50, University of California at Berkeley.
    19. Rubinstein, Mark, 1994. " Implied Binomial Trees," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(3), pages 771-818, July.
    20. K. Ronnie Sircar & George Papanicolaou, 1998. "General Black-Scholes models accounting for increased market volatility from hedging strategies," Applied Mathematical Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(1), pages 45-82.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Vagnani, Gianluca, 2009. "The Black-Scholes model as a determinant of the implied volatility smile: A simulation study," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 103-118, October.
    2. Park, Sang-Hyeon & Kim, Jeong-Hoon, 2013. "A semi-analytic pricing formula for lookback options under a general stochastic volatility model," Statistics & Probability Letters, Elsevier, vol. 83(11), pages 2537-2543.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:apmtfi:v:6:y:1999:i:2:p:107-145. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.