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Homeownership and Subjective Wellbeing in Urban China: Does Owning a House Make You Happier?

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  • Feng Hu

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Abstract

This paper examines the effect of homeownership status on individual subjective wellbeing indicators in urban China using a large nationally representative dataset. It is the first to gauge the relationship between homeownership and individual subjective wellbeing in the setting of China and is also among the few empirical studies concerning developing countries. The results show that the homeownership status does have a strong positive effect on both one’s housing satisfaction and overall happiness in urban China. Even after controlling for housing satisfaction in the equation, the homeownership status still positively affects one’s overall happiness, suggesting that the homeownership status might also contribute to other possible aspects of life satisfaction except for housing satisfaction. In addition, in terms of housing satisfaction, females seem to value much more on owning a house than males, while the subjective benefits of owing a house in large cities seem to be much smaller than in small cities. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-011-9967-6
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

Volume (Year): 110 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (February)
Pages: 951-971

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Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:110:y:2013:i:3:p:951-971

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Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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Keywords: Happiness; Housing; Ordered probit model; China;

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