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The Relationship Between Social Leisure and Life Satisfaction: Causality and Policy Implications

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  • Leonardo Becchetti

    ()

  • Elena Giachin Ricca

    ()

  • Alessandra Pelloni

    ()

Abstract

Social leisure is generally found to be positively correlated with life satisfaction in the empirical literature. We ask if this association captures a genuine causal effect by using panel data from the GSOEP. Our identification strategy exploits the change in social leisure brought about by retirement, since the latter is an event after which the time investable in (the outside job) relational life increases. We instrument social leisure with various measures of the age cohort specific probability of retirement. With such approach we document that social leisure has a positive and significant effect on life satisfaction. Our findings shed some light on the age-happiness pattern. Policy implications are also discussed. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

Volume (Year): 108 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 453-490

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Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:108:y:2012:i:3:p:453-490

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Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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Related research

Keywords: Life satisfaction; Social leisure; Retirement;

References

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Cited by:
  1. J. Tomás & P. Sancho & M. Gutiérrez & L. Galiana, 2014. "Predicting Life Satisfaction in the Oldest-Old: A Moderator Effects Study," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 117(2), pages 601-613, June.
  2. Emilio Colombo & Luca Stanca, 2013. "Measuring the Monetary Value of Social Relations: a Hedonic Approach," Working Papers 256, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2013.
  3. Leonardo Becchetti & Fabio Pisani, 2014. "Family Economic Well-Being, and (Class) Relative Wealth: An Empirical Analysis of Life Satisfaction of Secondary School Students in Three Italian Cities," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 503-525, June.

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