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Neuroeconomics: two camps gradually converging: what can economics gain from it?

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  • Jack Vromen

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s12232-011-0127-8
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal International Review of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 58 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 267-285

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:inrvec:v:58:y:2011:i:3:p:267-285

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/12232

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    Related research

    Keywords: Neuroeconomics; Decision-making; Behavioral economics in the scanner; Economics of neural activity; B41; D03; D87;

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    References

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    1. Drew Fudenberg & David K. Levine, 2004. "A Dual Self Model of Impulse Control," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 2049, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
    2. Andrew Caplin & Mark Dean, 2008. "Dopamine, Reward Prediction Error, and Economics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 123(2), pages 663-701, 05.
    3. Faruk Gul & Wolfgang Pesendorfer, 2006. "Random Expected Utility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(1), pages 121-146, 01.
    4. Wilcox, Nathaniel T., 2008. "Against Simplicity And Cognitive Individualism," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(03), pages 523-532, November.
    5. Laibson, David, 1997. "Golden Eggs and Hyperbolic Discounting," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(2), pages 443-77, May.
    6. Ross, Don, 2008. "Two Styles Of Neuroeconomics," Economics and Philosophy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 24(03), pages 473-483, November.
    7. W. Pesendorfer & F. Gul, 1999. "Temptation and Self-Control," Princeton Economic Theory Papers 99f1, Economics Department, Princeton University.
    8. Don Ross, 2007. "Economic Theory and Cognitive Science: Microexplanation," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262681684, December.
    9. Andrew Caplin & Mark Dean & Paul W. Glimcher & Robb B. Rutledge, 2010. "Measuring Beliefs and Rewards: A Neuroeconomic Approach," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 125(3), pages 923-960, August.
    10. O'Donoghue, Ted & Rabin, Matthew, 1997. "Doing It Now or Later," Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt7t44m5b0, Department of Economics, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    11. Isabelle Brocas & Juan D. Carrillo, 2008. "The Brain as a Hierarchical Organization," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1312-46, September.
    12. Aldo Rustichini, 2009. "Is There a Method of Neuroeconomics?," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 48-59, August.
    13. Joel Sobel, 2009. "Neuroeconomics: A Comment on Bernheim," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(2), pages 60-67, August.
    14. Alan P. Kirman, 1992. "Whom or What Does the Representative Individual Represent?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 117-136, Spring.
    15. Jack Vromen, 2010. "Where economics and neuroscience might meet," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 171-183.
    16. Colin F. Camerer, 2007. "Neuroeconomics: Using Neuroscience to Make Economic Predictions," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(519), pages C26-C42, 03.
    17. Jack Vromen, 2007. "Neuroeconomics as a Natural Extension of Bioeconomics: The Shifting Scope of Standard Economic Theory," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 9(2), pages 145-167, August.
    18. Milton Friedman & L. J. Savage, 1948. "The Utility Analysis of Choices Involving Risk," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 279.
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    Cited by:
    1. Luca Stanca, 2011. "Social science and neuroscience: how can they inform each other?," International Review of Economics, Springer, vol. 58(3), pages 243-256, September.
    2. Gonzalo Valdés-Edwards & Salvador Valdés-Prieto, 2013. "A Tractable Theory of Choice Based on Cell Behavior," CESifo Working Paper Series 4424, CESifo Group Munich.

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