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Segregation Through the Lens of Housing Unit Transition: What Roles Do the Prior Residents, the Local Micro-Neighborhood, and the Broader Neighborhood Play?

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  • John Hipp

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    Abstract

    This study focuses on segregation as it plays out at the micro-level of housing unit transition. Employing a unique sample that places housing units into micro-neighborhoods and census tracts, this study tests whether the characteristics of the previous residents of the unit, the local micro-neighborhood, or the broader tract best explain the race/ethnicity of the new residents in a housing unit. The results show that the racial/ethnic composition of the local micro-neighborhood has even stronger effects on the race/ethnicity of the new residents than does the racial/ethnic composition of the broader census tract. The results also reveal that even when the racial/ethnic composition of these two contexts are accounted for, the race/ethnicity of the prior residents has a very strong effect on the race/ethnicity of the new residents. I consider possible explanations for this household-level effect. One new theoretical explanation I put forward is that prospective residents use the race/ethnicity of the prior residents as a signal regarding the neighborhood’s appropriateness for them; I test and find that this hypothesized signaling effect is even stronger in certain micro-neighborhood, neighborhood, and county contexts. Copyright Population Association of America 2012

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s13524-012-0121-0
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Demography.

    Volume (Year): 49 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 4 (November)
    Pages: 1285-1306

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    Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:49:y:2012:i:4:p:1285-1306

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    Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/13524

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    Related research

    Keywords: Residential mobility; Segregation; Signaling theory;

    References

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    1. Maria Krysan, 2002. "Whites who say they’d flee: Who are they, and why would they leave?," Demography, Springer, vol. 39(4), pages 675-696, November.
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    14. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
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    Cited by:
    1. Daniel Lichter, 2013. "Integration or Fragmentation? Racial Diversity and the American Future," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(2), pages 359-391, April.

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