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Voting for a Lottery

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Author Info

  • David Giacopassi

    (University of Memphis, Tennessee)

  • Mark W. Nichols
  • B. Grant Stitt

    (University of Nevada, Reno)

Abstract

State lotteries have been adopted by thirty-eight states, primarily as a means of funding “good causes†or closing budgetary gaps. While several studies have identified the regressive nature of lotteries and factors responsible for their expansion, less is known about the underlying voting patterns that have driven this expansion. This article examines county-level voting patterns from the 2002 Tennessee lottery referendum and county-level lottery expenditures to determine whether voting reflects a latent demand for lottery or is a deliberate attempt to shift the tax burden. The results indicate that the percentage voting for lottery approval and lottery expenditure is not correlated with income and negatively correlated with education. Voting patterns are therefore similar to lottery participation, suggesting that voting reflects a latent demand for lottery. Lottery expenditure patterns for border counties exhibit familiar cross-border shopping patterns. Casino gambling is a substitute for instant but not online games.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by in its journal Public Finance Review.

Volume (Year): 34 (2006)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 80-100

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Handle: RePEc:sae:pubfin:v:34:y:2006:i:1:p:80-100

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Related research

Keywords: voting; lottery; latent demand;

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Cited by:
  1. Zuzanna Halicka & Michał Krawczyk, 2014. "Happy-go-lucky. Positive emotions boost demand for lotto," Working Papers 2014-09, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
  2. Horácio Faustino & Maria João Kaiseler & Rafael Marques, 2009. "Why Do People Buy Lottery Products?," Working Papers Department of Economics 2009/01, ISEG - School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, University of Lisbon.
  3. Mark Skidmore & Mehmet Serkan Tosun, 2005. "Do New Lottery Games Stimulate Retail Activity? Evidence from West Virginia Counties," Working Papers 05-06, UW-Whitewater, Department of Economics.
  4. Peter Calcagno & Douglas Walker & John Jackson, 2010. "Determinants of the probability and timing of commercial casino legalization in the United States," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 142(1), pages 69-90, January.
  5. Maria João Kaizeler & Horácio C. Faustino, 2008. "Demand for Lottery Products: A Cross-Country Analysis," Working Papers Department of Economics 2008/33, ISEG - School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, University of Lisbon.

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