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Pareto-Improving Intergenerational Transfers

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  • Wigger, Berthold U

Abstract

In the presence of endogenous growth intergenerational transfer from the young to the old reduce per capita income growth and harm future generations. On the other hand, competitive equilibria are inefficient if externalities sustain long-run growth. This paper shows that if individuals retire in the last period of their life, the inefficiency of the market economy can be removed by an investment subsidy without making the current or future generations worse off only if coupled with intergenerational transfers from the young to the old. Copyright 2001 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 53 (2001)
Issue (Month): 2 (April)
Pages: 260-80

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:53:y:2001:i:2:p:260-80

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References

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  1. King, Ian & Ferguson, Don, 1993. "Dynamic inefficiency, endogenous growth, and Ponzi games," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 79-104, August.
  2. Jappelli, Tullio & Pagano, Marco, 1995. "The Welfare Effects of Liquidity Constraints," CEPR Discussion Papers 1108, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Grossman, Gene M. & Yanagawa, Noriyuki, 1993. "Asset bubbles and endogenous growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 3-19, February.
  4. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-37, October.
  5. Saint-Paul, G., 1991. "Fiscal Policy In An Endogenous Growth Model," DELTA Working Papers 91-04, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  6. Jones, Larry E. & Manuelli, Rodolfo E., 1992. "Finite lifetimes and growth," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 171-197, December.
  7. BELAN, Pascal & MICHEL, Philippe & PESTIEAU, Pierre, . "Pareto-improving social security reform," CORE Discussion Papers RP -1372, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  8. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
  9. Boldrin, Michele, 1992. "Dynamic externalities, multiple equilibria, and growth," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 58(2), pages 198-218, December.
  10. Azariadis, Costas & Drazen, Allan, 1990. "Threshold Externalities in Economic Development," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 105(2), pages 501-26, May.
  11. Romer, Paul M, 1987. "Growth Based on Increasing Returns Due to Specialization," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(2), pages 56-62, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Weizsäcker, Robert K. von & Wigger, Berthold U., 2001. "Rentenfinanzierung und intergenerationelle Gerechtigkeit : Eine wachstumstheoretische Perspektive," Discussion Papers 606, Institut fuer Volkswirtschaftslehre und Statistik, Abteilung fuer Volkswirtschaftslehre.
  2. Andreas Irmen & Berthold U. Wigger, 2001. "Trade Union Objectives and Economic Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 551, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Kolmar, Martin & Meier, Volker, 2012. "Intragenerational externalities and intergenerational transfers," Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(04), pages 531-548, October.
  4. Yew, Siew Ling & Zhang, Jie, 2013. "Socially optimal social security and education subsidization in a dynastic model with human capital externalities, fertility and endogenous growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 154-175.
  5. Berthold U. Wigger, 2001. "Higher Education Financing and Income Redistribution," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 58(1), pages 48-, December.
  6. Berthold U. Wigger & Robert K. von Weizs?cker, 2001. "Risk, Resources, and Education: Public Versus Private Financing of Higher Education," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 48(3), pages 6.
  7. Berthold Wigger, 2005. "Public Debt, Human Capital Formation, and Dynamic Inefficiency," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 47-59, January.
  8. Kaas, Leo, 2003. "Productive government spending, growth, and sequential voting," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 227-246, June.

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