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Making sense of the manufacturing belt: determinants of U.S. industrial location, 1880--1920

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  • Alexander Klein
  • Nicholas Crafts

Abstract

This paper investigates the ability of the new economic geography to explain the persistence of the manufacturing belt in the United States around the turn of the 20th century using a model which subsumes both market-potential and factor-endowment arguments. The results show that market potential was central to the existence of the manufacturing belt, that it mattered more than factor endowments, and that its impact came through interactions both with scale economies and with linkage effects. Natural advantage played a role in industrial location but only through agricultural inputs which were important for a small subset of manufacturing.(First published March 2010, revised October 2010)

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Journal of Economic Geography.

Volume (Year): 12 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 (July)
Pages: 775-807

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Handle: RePEc:oup:jecgeo:v:12:y:2012:i:4:p:775-807

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References

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  1. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "History and Industry Location: The Case of the Manufacturing Belt," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 80-83, May.
  2. Krugman, Paul R & Venables, Anthony J, 1995. "Globalization and the Inequality of Nations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(4), pages 857-80, November.
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  6. Nicholas Crafts & Abay Mulatu, 2004. "How did the location of industry respond to falling transport costs in Britain before World War 1?," Economic History Working Papers 22555, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
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  8. Russell Hillberry & David Hummels, 2002. "Intra-national Home Bias: Some Explanations," NBER Working Papers 9022, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  14. Goldin, Claudia, 1998. "America's Graduation from High School: The Evolution and Spread of Secondary Schooling in the Twentieth Century," Scholarly Articles 2664307, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  15. Holger C. Wolf, 2000. "Intranational Home Bias In Trade," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(4), pages 555-563, November.
  16. Keith Head & Thierry Mayer, 2004. "Market Potential and the Location of Japanese Investment in the European Union," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 86(4), pages 959-972, November.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Julio Martínez-Galarraga, 2014. "Market potential estimates in history: a survey of methods and an application to Spain, 1867-1930," Working Papers 0051, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  2. Martinez-Galarraga, Julio, 2012. "The determinants of industrial location in Spain, 1856–1929," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 255-275.
  3. Crafts, Nicholas & O’Rourke, Kevin Hjortshøj, 2014. "Twentieth Century Growth*This research has received funding from the European Research Council under the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) / ERC grant agreement no. 249546," Handbook of Economic Growth, in: Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 6, pages 263-346 Elsevier.
  4. Alan Fernihough & Kevin Hjortshøj O'Rourke, 2014. "Coal and the European Industrial Revolution," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp439, IIIS.
  5. Julio Martínez-Galarraga & Daniel A. Tirado-Fabregat & Rafael González-Val, 2014. "Market Potential and Regional Economic Growth in Spain, 1860-1930," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1409, Asociación Española de Historia Económica.

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