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The Distributional Effects of Oil Price Changes on Household Income: Evidence from Mali

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  • Kangni Kpodar
  • Calvin Djiofack

Abstract

Many net oil-importing developing countries, particularly African economies, have faced economic difficulties with high oil price increases. As a case study, this paper assesses the distributional effects of a rise in various petroleum product prices in Mali using a standard computable general equilibrium model. The results suggest that rising diesel prices primarily affect richer households, while the poorest ones tend to suffer more from higher kerosene and gasoline prices. Overall, the impact of fuel prices on household budgets shows a U-shaped relationship with expenditure per capita. Regardless of the oil product considered, high-income households benefit disproportionately from oil price subsidies. This suggests that petroleum price subsidies are ineffective in protecting the income of poor households compared with a targeted subsidy. Copyright 2010 The author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Centre for the Study of African Economies. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oxfordjournals.org, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE) in its journal Journal of African Economies.

Volume (Year): 19 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 205-236

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Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:19:y:2010:i:2:p:205-236

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  1. Abbas Valadkhani & William F. Mitchell, 2002. "Assessing the Impact of Changes in Petroleum Prices on Inflation and Household Expenditures in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 35(2), pages 122-132.
  2. Gately, D. & Streifel, S.S., 1997. "The demand for Oil Products in Developing Countries," World Bank - Discussion Papers 359, World Bank.
  3. McDonald, Scott & van Schoor, Melt, 2005. "A Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Analysis of the Impact of an Oil Price Increase in South Africa," Working Paper Series 15633, PROVIDE Project.
  4. John C.B. Cooper, 2003. "Price elasticity of demand for crude oil: estimates for 23 countries," OPEC Energy Review, Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, vol. 27(1), pages 1-8, 03.
  5. Benedict J. Clements & Sanjeev Gupta & Hong-Sang Jung, 2003. "Real and Distributive Effects of Petroleum Price Liberalization," IMF Working Papers 03/204, International Monetary Fund.
  6. Alves, Denisard C. O. & De Losso da Silveira Bueno, Rodrigo, 2003. "Short-run, long-run and cross elasticities of gasoline demand in Brazil," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 191-199, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Plante, Michael, 2014. "The long-run macroeconomic impacts of fuel subsidies," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 129-143.
  2. Michael Plante Author-X-Name-First: Michael Author-X-Name-Last: Plante, 2013. "TheLong-RunMacroeconomicImpactsofFuelSubsidies," Caepr Working Papers 2013-002, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington.
  3. Rodriguez, U-Primo E., 2007. "State-of-the-Art in Regional Computable General Equilibrium Modelling with a Case Study of the Philippines," Agricultural Economics Research Review, Agricultural Economics Research Association (India), vol. 20(1).
  4. Ashokankur Datta, 2008. "The incidence of fuel taxation in India," Indian Statistical Institute, Planning Unit, New Delhi Discussion Papers 08-05, Indian Statistical Institute, New Delhi, India.
  5. Mathew Adagunodo, 2013. "Petroleum Products Pricing Reform in Nigeria: Welfare Analysis from Household Budget Survey," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 3(4), pages 459 - 472.
  6. AydIn, Levent & Acar, Mustafa, 2011. "Economic impact of oil price shocks on the Turkish economy in the coming decades: A dynamic CGE analysis," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 1722-1731, March.

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