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The demand for Oil Products in Developing Countries

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  • Gately, D.
  • Streifel, S.S.
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    Abstract

    Oil and energy markets have experienced dramatic changes over the past two decades-steep price increases in the 1970s and 1980s followed by a decrease in 1986 and large declines in demand in the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. But despite considerable uncertainty about future developments in the world oil market, this paper finds that demand is set to rise in all main regions, particularly in developing countries, led by increasing incomes, population, industrialization, investment, and trade. This study examines the growth in demand for eight major oil products for 37 developing countries over the 1971-93 period, analyzing the relationships and changes over time for income, population, and demand for energy and oil products for each country.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by World Bank in its series World Bank - Discussion Papers with number 359.

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    Length: 88 pages
    Date of creation: 1997
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:fth:wobadi:359

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    Keywords: PETROLEUM INDUSTRY ; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES ; TRADE;

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    Cited by:
    1. Kangni Kpodar, 2006. "Distributional Effects of Oil Price Changeson Household Expenditures," IMF Working Papers 06/91, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Kangni KPODAR, 2007. "Impact de l’accroissement du prix des produits pétroliers sur la distribution des revenus au Mali," Working Papers 200701, CERDI.
    3. Danny García Callejas, 2005. "Economic Growth, Consumption and Oil Scarcity in Colombia: A Ramsey model, time series and panel data approach," BORRADORES DEL CIE 004180, UNIVERSIDAD DE ANTIOQUIA - CIE.
    4. Iwayemi, Akin & Adenikinju, Adeola & Babatunde, M. Adetunji, 2010. "Estimating petroleum products demand elasticities in Nigeria: A multivariate cointegration approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 73-85, January.

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