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Spillover Impacts of a Reproductive Health Program on Elderly Women in Rural Bangladesh

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  • Anoshua Chaudhuri

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10834-009-9141-3
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Family and Economic Issues.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 2 (June)
    Pages: 113-125

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:30:y:2009:i:2:p:113-125

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    Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=104904

    Related research

    Keywords: Bangladesh; Body mass index; Elderly; Health; Spillover effects;

    References

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    1. Eric V. Edmonds & Kristin Mammen & Douglas L. Miller, 2005. "Rearranging the Family?: Income Support and Elderly Living Arrangements in a Low-Income Country," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 40(1).
    2. Jariah Masud & Sharifah Haron & Lucy Gikonyo, 2008. "Gender Differences in Income Sources of the Elderly in Peninsular Malaysia," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 623-633, December.
    3. Kochar, Anjini, 1999. "Evaluating Familial Support for the Elderly: The Intrahousehold Allocation of Medical Expenditures in Rural Pakistan," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(3), pages 620-56, April.
    4. Shareen Joshi & T. Paul Schultz, 2007. "Family Planning as an Investment in Development: Evaluation of a Program's Consequences in Matlab, Bangladesh," Working Papers 951, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    5. Aydogan Ulker, 2008. "Wealth Holdings and Portfolio Allocation of the Elderly: The Role of Marital History," Economics Series 2008_16, Deakin University, Faculty of Business and Law, School of Accounting, Economics and Finance.
    6. van de Walle, Dominique, 1995. "Public spending and the poor : what we know, what we need to know," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1476, The World Bank.
    7. Rosenzweig, Mark R. & Wolpin, Kenneth I., 1988. "Migration selectivity and the effects of public programs," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 265-289, December.
    8. Mohamed Abdel-Ghany, 2008. "Problematic Progress in Asia: Growing Older and Apart," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 549-569, December.
    9. John Knodel & Mary Beth Ofstedal, 2003. "Gender and Aging in the Developing World: Where Are the Men?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 29(4), pages 677-698.
    10. Celia Hayhoe & Michelle Stevenson, 2007. "Financial Attitudes and Inter vivos Resource Transfers from Older Parents to Adult Children," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 123-135, March.
    11. Angelucci, Manuela & De Giorgi, Giacomo, 2006. "Indirect Effects of an Aid Program: The Case of Progresa and Consumption," IZA Discussion Papers 1955, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1986. "Evaluating the Effects of Optimally Distributed Public Programs: ChildHealth and Family Planning Interventions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(3), pages 470-82, June.
    13. Edward Miguel & Michael Kremer, 2004. "Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(1), pages 159-217, 01.
    14. Nikhil Roy & Andrew D. Foster, 1996. "The Dynamics of Education and Fertility: Evidence from a Family Planning Experiment"," Home Pages _073, University of Pennsylvania.
    15. Basu, Kaushik & Foster, James E., 1998. "On measuring literacy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1997, The World Bank.
    16. Anoshua Chaudhuri, 2008. "Revisiting the Impact of a Reproductive Health Intervention on Children’s Height-for-Age with Evidence from Rural Bangladesh," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 619-656.
    17. Behrman, Jere R. & Deolalikar, Anil B., 1988. "Health and nutrition," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 14, pages 631-711 Elsevier.
    18. Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Human resources: Empirical modeling of household and family decisions," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 34, pages 1883-2023 Elsevier.
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    Cited by:
    1. Hung-Hao Chang & Rodolfo Nayga & Kung-Chi Chan, 2011. "Gendered Analyses of Nutrient Deficiencies Among the Elderly," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 268-279, June.
    2. Meng, Channarith & Pfau, Wade Donald, 2011. "Simulating the impacts of cash transfers on poverty and school attendance: The case of Cambodia," MPRA Paper 30472, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Gregory Ponthiere, 2011. "Mortality, Family and Lifestyles," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(2), pages 175-190, June.
    4. Singh, Prakarsh, 2011. "Spillovers in learning and behavior: Evidence from a nutritional information campaign in urban slums," MPRA Paper 33362, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Christina Robinson, 2013. "Younger Siblings Can Be Good for Your Health: An Examination of Spillover Benefits from the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 172-184, June.
    6. Zhuo Chen & Qi Zhang, 2011. "Nutrigenomics Hypothesis: Examining the Association Between Food Stamp Program Participation and Bodyweight Among Low-Income Women," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 508-520, September.
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