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Child support reform: some analysis of the 1999 White Paper

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  • Ian Walker

    ()
    (Institute for Fiscal Studies and University of Warwick)

  • Gillian Paull

    ()
    (Institute for Fiscal Studies)

  • Yu Zhu

Abstract

This paper uses a sample of lone mothers (and former lone mothers who are now repartnered) drawn from the 1997 Family Resources Survey to analyse the potential effects of reforming the UK system of child support. The main deficiency of the data is that non-resident fathers cannot be matched to the mothers in the data, and this is overcome by exploiting information from another dataset which gives the joint distribution of the characteristics of separated parents. The effects of reforming the child support system are simulated for the amount of maintenance liabilities, the amount paid and the net incomes of households containing mothers-with-care and of households containing non-resident fathers. The likely effects of the reform are simulated at various levels of compliance. The analysis highlights the need for further research into the incentive effects of child support on individual behaviour.

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Article provided by Institute for Fiscal Studies in its journal Fiscal Studies.

Volume (Year): 21 (2000)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 105-140

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Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:21:y:2000:i:1:p:105-140

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  1. Wei-Yin Hu, 1999. "Child Support, Welfare Dependency, and Women's Labor Supply," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 71-103.
  2. M. Keane & R. Mofitt, 1995. "A Structural Model of Multiple Welfare Program Participation and Labor Supply," Working Papers 95-4, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  3. Robins, Philip K, 1986. "Child Support, Welfare Dependency, and Poverty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 76(4), pages 768-88, September.
  4. Daniel Meyer, 1993. "Child support and welfare dynamics: Evidence from Wisconsin," Demography, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 45-62, February.
  5. Ian Walker & Ian Preston, 1999. "Welfare measurement in labour supply models with nonlinear budget constraints," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 343-361.
  6. I. Lin, . "Perceived Fairness and Compliance with Child Support Obligations," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1150-97, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
  7. Richard B. Freeman & Jane Waldfogel, 1998. "Dunning Delinquent Dads: The Effects of Child Support Enforcement on Child Support Receipt by Never Married Women," NBER Working Papers 6664, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Bingley, Paul & Walker, Ian, 1997. "The Labour Supply, Unemployment and Participation of Lone Mothers in In-Work Transfer Programmes," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 107(444), pages 1375-90, September.
  9. Richard Blundell & Thomas MaCurdy, 1998. "Labour supply: a review of alternative approaches," IFS Working Papers W98/18, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  10. Paul Bingley & Ian Walker, 1997. "Labour supply and in-work and in-kind transfers," IFS Working Papers W97/02, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  11. Judi Bartfeld, 1998. "Child Support and the Post-Divorce Economic Well-Being of Mothers, Fathers, and Children," JCPR Working Papers 50, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
  12. Paul Bingley & Elizabeth Symons & Ian Walker, 1994. "Child Support, Income Support and lone mothers," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 15(1), pages 81-98, February.
  13. Kurt J. Beron, 1990. "Policy Issues And Child Support Payment Behavior: Empirical Findings," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 8(1), pages 124-134, 01.
  14. Paul Bingley & Gauthier Lanot & Elizabeth Symons & Ian Walker, 1995. "Child Support Reform and the Labor Supply of Lone Mothers in the United Kingdom," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(2), pages 256-279.
  15. Irwin Garfinkel & Philip K. Robins & Pat Wong & Daniel R. Meyer, 1990. "The Wisconsin Child Support Assurance System: Estimated Effects on Poverty, Labor Supply, Caseloads, and Costs," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(1), pages 1-31.
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Cited by:
  1. Andrew Leigh, 2005. "Optimal Design of Earned Income Tax Credits: Evidence from a British Natural Experiment," CEPR Discussion Papers 488, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

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