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What can America learn from the British tax system?

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  • William Gale

Abstract

This paper examines elements of British tax policy and discusses their implications for the US, where several recent proposals would mirror aspects of the British system. These include reducing filing requirements under the individual income tax, indexing capital gains for inflation, cutting mortgage interest deductions, enacting a value added tax, and integrating the corporate and personal income taxes. The paper also discusses implications of the poll tax for tax reform. Britain and America have made different choices involving equity, efficiency, simplicity and other goals. These choices offer the chance to help identify the impact of tax policy.

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File URL: http://www.ifs.org.uk/fs/articles/fsgale.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Institute for Fiscal Studies in its journal Fiscal Studies.

Volume (Year): 18 (1997)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 341-369

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Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:18:y:1997:i:4:p:341-369

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References

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  1. Joel Slemrod & Jon Bakija, 2004. "Taxing Ourselves, 3rd Edition: A Citizen's Guide to the Debate over Taxes," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 3, volume 1, number 026269302x, December.
  2. Timothy Besley & Ian Preston & Michael Ridge, . "Fiscal anarchy in the UK: modelling poll tax noncompliance," Public Policy Discussion Papers 96-02, Economics and Finance Section, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University.
  3. Orazio Attanasio & James Banks, 1998. "Trends in household saving: a tale of two countries," IFS Working Papers W98/15, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  4. Burman, Leonard E & Randolph, William C, 1994. "Measuring Permanent Responses to Capital-Gains Tax Changes in Panel Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 794-809, September.
  5. Keen, Michael, 1997. "Peculiar Institutions: A British Perspective on Tax Policy in the United States," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 50(4), pages 779-802, December.
  6. Gale, William G. & Holtzblatt, Janet, 1997. "On the Possibility of a No-Return Tax System," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 50(3), pages 475-85, September.
  7. Smith, Peter, 1991. "Lessons from the British Poll Tax Disaster," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 44(4), pages 421-36, December.
  8. Joel Slemrod & Jon Bakija, 2008. "Taxing Ourselves, 4th Edition: A Citizen's Guide to the Debate over Taxes," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262693631, December.
  9. James Banks & Richard Blundell, 1994. "Taxation and Personal Saving Incentives in the United Kingdom," NBER Chapters, in: Public Policies and Household Savings, pages 57-80 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Mike Brewer, 2000. "Comparing in-work benefits and financial work incentives for low-income families in the US and the UK," IFS Working Papers W00/16, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  2. Mike Brewer & Paul Gregg, 2001. "Eradicating child poverty in Britain: welfare reform and children since 1997," IFS Working Papers W01/08, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  3. Georgia Kaplanoglou & David Michael Newbery, 2002. "Indirect Taxation in Greece: Evaluation and Possible Reform," CESifo Working Paper Series 661, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Keen, Michael, 1997. "Peculiar Institutions: A British Perspective on Tax Policy in the United States," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 50(4), pages 779-802, December.

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